1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 12

Working paper #51

səhifə1/12
tarix24.02.2018
ölçüsü326.23 Kb.

 

 

 

 

WORKING PAPER #51 

Which Districts Get Into Financial Trouble and Why: 

Michigan’s Story 

 

David Arsen 

Michigan State University  

 

Thomas A. DeLuca 

 Univeristy of Kansas  

 

Yongmei Ni  

University of Utah 

 

Michael Bates  

University of California, Riverside 

 

November 2015

 

 

 

The content of this paper does not necessarily reflect the views of The Education Policy Center or Michigan State University 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Author Information 

 

David Arsen

 

Professor, Department of Educational Administration

 

College of Education, Michigan State University

 

  Thomas A. DeLuca

 

Assistant Professor, Department of Educational Leadership & Policy Studies

 

School of Education, University of Kansas

 

 

Yongmei Ni

 

Associate Professor, Department of Education Leadership & Policy

 

College of Education, University of Utah

 

 

Michael Bates

 

Assistant Professor, Department of Economics

 

University of California, Riverside

 

 

Abstract 

Like other states, Michigan has implemented a number of policies to change governance and administrative 

arrangements in local school districts deem to be in financial emergency. This paper examines two questions: (1) Which 

districts get into financial trouble and why? and (2) Among fiscally distressed districts, are there significant differences in 

the characteristics of districts in which the state does and does not intervene?  We analyze factors influencing district 

fund balances utilizing fixed effect models on a statewide panel dataset of Michigan school districts from 1995 to 2012. 

We evaluate the impact of state school finance and choice policies, over which local districts have limited control, and 

local district resource allocation decisions (e.g., average class size, teacher salaries, and spending shares devoted to 

administration, employee health insurance, and contracted services). Our results indicate that 80% of the explained 

variation in district fiscal stress is due to changes in districts’ state funding, to enrollment changes including those 

associated with school choice policies, and to the enrollment of high-cost, special education students.  We also find that 

the districts in which the state has intervened have significantly higher shares of African-American and low-income 

students than other financially troubled Michigan districts, and they are in worse financial shape by some measures.

 

Acknowledgments 

The work reported here was partially supported by the American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan (Arsen and Ni) and by 

the Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, through Grant R305B090011 to Michigan State 

University for a doctoral training program in the economics of education (Bates).  We received excellent research 

assistance from Dongsook Han. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the Education 

Policy Center, Michigan State University, the ACLU or the U.S. Department of Education.  An earlier version of this paper 

was presented at the 2015 annual conference of the Association for Education Finance and Policy.

 

   

Which Districts Get Into Financial Trouble and Why: Michigan’s Story 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Arsen 

Professor, Department of Educational Administration 

College of Education, Michigan State University 

 

  Thomas A. DeLuca 

Assistant Professor, Department of Educational Leadership & Policy Studies 

School of Education, University of Kansas 

 

  Yongmei Ni 

Associate Professor, Department of Education Leadership & Policy 

College of Education, University of Utah 

 

  Michael Bates 

Assistant Professor, Department of Economics 

University of California, Riverside 

 

   

 

 

The work reported here was partially supported by the American Civil Liberties Union of 

Michigan (Arsen and Ni) and by the Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of 

Education, through Grant R305B090011 to Michigan State University for a doctoral training 

program in the economics of education (Bates).  We received excellent research assistance from 

Dongsook Han. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the 

Education Policy Center, Michigan State University, the ACLU or the U.S. Department of 

Education.  An earlier version of this paper was presented at the 2015 annual conference of the 

Association for Education Finance and Policy.  

 


 

Which Districts Get Into Financial Trouble and Why: Michigan’s Story 

 

 

ABSTRACT 

Like other states, Michigan has implemented a number of policies to change governance 

and administrative arrangements in local school districts deem to be in financial emergency. This 

paper examines two questions: (1) Which districts get into financial trouble and why? and (2) 

Among fiscally distressed districts, are there significant differences in the characteristics of 

districts in which the state does and does not intervene?  We analyze factors influencing district 

fund balances utilizing fixed effect models on a statewide panel dataset of Michigan school 

districts from 1995 to 2012. We evaluate the impact of state school finance and choice policies, 

over which local districts have limited control, and local district resource allocation decisions 

(e.g., average class size, teacher salaries, and spending shares devoted to administration, 

employee health insurance, and contracted services). Our results indicate that 80% of the 

explained variation in district fiscal stress is due to changes in districts’ state funding, to 

enrollment changes including those associated with school choice policies, and to the enrollment 

of high-cost, special education students.  We also find that the districts in which the state has 

intervened have significantly higher shares of African-American and low-income students than 

other financially troubled Michigan districts, and they are in worse financial shape by some 

measures. 

 

INTRODUCTION  

Legislation in a growing number of states authorizes state governments to take over local 

school districts experiencing financial emergencies (Anderson, 2012; Bowman, 2013 and 2011). 




Dostları ilə paylaş:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


uniontemporal---unin.html

unique-id-name-of-the-10.html

unique-id-name-of-the-104.html

unique-id-name-of-the-109.html

unique-id-name-of-the-113.html