1 2

The uk an assessment of the Aerospace, Defence, Security and the eu and Space Industry - bet 2

bet2/2
Sana14.05.2017
Hajmi255.36 Kb.

stability

Well developed political, legal and financial system

Key:

Current EU membership has a favourable impact on this investment criteria

Current EU membership has a neutral impact on this investment criteria 

Source:

Interviews conducted with a sample of ADS members in April and May 2015



14

The UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space Industry and the EU

Investment decision making

The aerospace, defence and space sectors are characterised 

by long lead-time investment decisions linked to large, 

complex platforms, systems and services with extended 

timeframes for return on investment. The security sector has 

a diverse and fragmented customer and supplier base, 

forcing companies to be more dynamic, responsive and agile. 

In either case, stability and certainty in the broader business 

environment is a key factor in investment decisions.

Paul Kahn, President of Airbus Group UK 

which employs 

over 16,000 people in the UK, has stated very clearly that: 

As set out on the previous page a number of major overseas 

investors to the UK cited during the course of this survey 

how they saw membership of the EU as a positive factor in 

their decision to invest in the UK. Non membership would 

introduce a risk due to uncertainty over the post-EU 

economic environment and how conditions may change over 

the course of an investment. 

Given the long investment cycles, the impact of Brexit would 

most likely be felt over the long-run. 

This was echoed in the recent interview with Tom Williams, 

COO, Airbus SAS and Mr Kahn who stressed that if Britain 

were to leave the EU, the company would not suddenly 

close its presence in Britain. The impact would potentially be 

felt in the next phase of investment decisions by global 

OEMs. This is particularly relevant when considered in the 

context of the number of new entrants seeking to increase 

their design and engineering presence in the aerospace 

defence, security and space industries. 

As part of this survey we interviewed a number of EU and 

non EU investors into the UK over the last decade. They 

unequivocally believed that membership of the EU was a 

positive rather than negative factor in their investment 

decision. Factors they highlighted in particular included: 

the importance of mobility of skilled workers across their 

European footprint (and that of their suppliers); the ability to 

access EU resource, including engineering graduates, in 

order to fill UK skills gaps; and the freedom of trade with 

customers, group companies and suppliers across the EU. 

At all levels this also included the ability of the UK to 

influence EU decisions around standards which impact the 

global aerospace industry, from certification to chemical 

regulations. 

Whilst there were a number of other important factors 

which would be equally relevant whether the UK was a 

member of the EU or not, the majority of investors saw little 

obvious enhancement to their investment decision if the UK 

was not part of the EU. This reflected the view that the 

industry is a global one and the UK as an independent 

participant would still have to comply with the majority of 

regulations. 

If after an exit from the European Union,  economic conditions in Britain were less  favourable for business than in other parts of  Europe, or beyond, would Airbus reconsider  future investment in the United Kingdom?  Yes, absolutely.”

Net FDI inflows to the UK

Note:


FDI inflows taken from ONS, for Manufacture of Other Transport Equipment’ –

however, this will include the sub-sector of ‘Manufacture of Aircraft and Spacecraft’, 

as well as Marine (both civil and defence)

Source:


ONS

(600)


(400)

(200)


0

200


400

600


800

1,000


2010

2011


2012

2013


£m

Year


EU

Global


The UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space Industry and the EU

15

AVIONICS

Cobham

HR Smith


GE Aviation

ENGINE AND PROPULSION SYSTEM

Rolls Royce

GE Aviation

Eaton

Firth Rixson

NACELLES

UTC –


Goodrich

LANDING GEAR

Messier Bugatti Dowty

Ford Aerospace

Bromford Industries

FUSELAGE


Spirit

Hexcel


WING ASSEMBLY COMPONENTS

GE Aviation

GKN

Spirit


Doncasters

Manufax


Teledyne SITEC group

Centrax


Firth Rixson

Centrax


The A350 XWB is an example of a fully 

integrated, global supply chain with a 

significant pan-European footprint, which is 

spread across the EU’s largest aerospace 

industries with development, manufacturing 

and assembly in the UK, Germany, France 

and Spain. 

The A350 XWB supply chain in the UK is not 

limited to those components developed, 

tested and assembled in this country. This 

highlights the importance of the EU to the 

UK aerospace industry – as the majority of 

parts manufactured in the UK are 

assembled in the EU, it is crucial for UK 

manufacturers to limit any barriers to trade. 

FREE TRADE WITH THE  EU

UK is fully integrated in supply chains

FILTON

● Wing – development

Landing Gear – development and testing

Fuel Systems – development and testing

SAINT-NAZAIRE

Nose and Centre 

Fuselage –assembly 

and equipping

Nose and Centre 

Fuselage – testing

BROUGHTON

Wing Box – assembly and 

pre-equipping

NANTES


Centre Wing Box, Keel 

Beam, Radome and Air 

Inlet – manufacturing

Centre Wing Box, Keel 

Beam, Radome and Air 

Inlet – assembly

GETAFE

● Horizontal Tail Plane –

assembly and equipping

S19 – assembly

ILLESCAS

Wing Lower Cover –

manufacturing and 

sub-assembly

S19 Full Barrel Skin –

manufacturing

PUERTO REAL

Horizontal Tail Plane 

Boxes – assembly

TOULOUS


E

Aircraft Development

Structure and 

Systems – testing

Final Assembly

Flight Test

Customer Delivery

SAINT-ELOI

Pylon, Air Inlet and Nacelle 

Integration – development

Pylon and Aft Pylon Fairing 

– manufacturing

Pylon and Aft Pylon Fairing 

– assembly and integration

BREMEN


Cargo Loading Systems –

development

Wing Movable Surfaces –

development and testing

Flaps – assembly

Wing – equipping

HAMBURG

● Cabin and Fuselage –

development

Aft Fuselage – assembly and 

equipping

Forward Fuselage – equipping

Cabin and Fuselage – testing

Customer Definition Centre

STADE

Aft Fuselage Upper and 

Lower Shells – manufacturing

Wing Upper Cover –

manufacturing

Vertical Tail Plane – assembly 

and equipping

Vertical Tail Plane – testing

LEGEND

Development/

Testing

Manufacturing

Assembly/

Equipping

Customer

Delivery

Source:


Airbus UK

Source:


ADS, Publically available information

Airbus’ European footprint

Major UK Suppliers to the Airbus A350 XWB



16

The UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space Industry and the EU

Case study: 

Gardner Aerospace

59% of survey respondents saw free trade 

within the EU as a benefit to their company with 

89% of members exporting to Europe. 

Paul Kahn, president of Airbus Group UK, aired his concerns 

to Welsh business leaders during a speech in London and 

echoed the opinions of other EU and non-EU companies we 

have interviewed as part of this survey. 

“We look for a stable competitive economic environment to 

operate in, and we are a successful integrated European 

company. So we work with France, Germany, and Spain in 

particular and we want to work as efficiently as possible 

across those borders. So anything which disrupts that is a 

concern to us,” he said.

The EU guarantees free trade across Europe and pushes for 

free trade across the globe. It has approximately 100 free 

trade agreements globally and is working towards a free 

trade agreement with the US that would remove tariffs for 

EU companies trading with the US. 

The UK would need to get free trade agreements in place, 

which would have a time cost and create an added layer of 

bureaucracy, resulting in uncertainty for UK companies and 

inward investors alike. 

This uncertainty was the key issue coming out of the 

interviews we have had, even if protectionist tariffs are 

unlikely to actually be applied if the UK were to leave the EU. 

Because the UK is embedded in the EU supply chain for 

existing programmes, it is unlikely an EU exit would impact 

industry over the long run and could be impossible to 

reverse. If investment decisions on new programmes of 

work are made elsewhere, with EU OEMs allocating work 

within the EU, future generations will feel those impacts. 

An EU exit would potentially impact the UK’s 

leverage in the EU defence market.

The UK defence sector is the largest exporter of defence 

equipment and services in Europe and second globally to 

the US. 

The Defence market continues to be heavily influenced by 

government policy and the ability of governments to work 

together to achieve a mutually advantageous outcome. 

Examples include the A400M Military Transporter and 

Eurofighter. These programmes arose from pan European 

co-operation and have benefited UK companies such as 

BAE Systems. 

Importance of EU market to UK manufacturers

Gardner Aerospace is a UK privately owned 

business, focused on the Aerostructures market. 

Its largest customer is Airbus and its expansion has 

been driven by its ability to leverage its relationships 

and success with Airbus sites in the UK, Germany 

and France.  I would think that life would be a lot more  difficult for Gardner outside of the EU. Our biggest customer is based in France and  anything that made trade more difficult  would be a negative for us. Items such as customs documentation and  potential import duties would add  considerably to cost and bureaucracy.”

Nick Sanders, Executive Chairman Gardner Aerospace

An EU exit can only bring potential barriers.  It is already difficult to make investment  decisions with regards to currency risk.”

N. American manufacturer with UK presence

The people making long-term decisions see  the risk. Uncertainty is not a positive word.”

UK based tier 1 with European operations



The UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space Industry and the EU

17

For British Eurosceptics who thought Switzerland 

offered a template for prosperity outside the European 

Union, recent events make awkward viewing. 

They like the idea that Switzerland, like Norway, exists 

outside the EU but still enjoys virtually the same access to 

the EU’s Single Market via a package of bilateral treaties 

signed with Brussels. 

The major issue for the Swiss is that this access is also 

dependent on freedom of movement – in other words, if 

Switzerland breaches one treaty then all others, including its 

Single Market agreement, are also breached. 

So when the Swiss voted in a referendum to curb migration 

last February, they set themselves on a collision course with 

the European Commission. 

Brussels is playing tough, fearing the message that giving 

ground would send to Britain. 

The federal government is fast learning that it can’t win an 

arm wrestle with such a powerful neighbour – the Swiss sell 

around 60%

(1)


of their exports to the EU – and it has 

promptly backed down.

A year after the referendum, the government’s latest 

proposal in response to the immigration referendum 

removes any restriction on EU citizens – focusing instead on 

far smaller numbers of non-EU migrants. 

Recent bilateral talks have focused on areas including the 

‘passporting’ of Swiss banks to work across the EU (an area 

of critical importance to Britain’s financial services sector). 

But the Commission is refusing to budge until Switzerland 

accepts an institutional treaty that would allow previous 

agreements between the two to be amended should EU 

legislation also change in that area. 

Far from feeling independent, the Swiss would have to 

swallow not only new regulations but also the effective 

subjugation of its courts on commercial matters.

Within a couple of years, the Swiss are likely to be back 

at the ballot box – again voting on immigration. Switzerland is 

fundamentally a pragmatic nation and will preserve its long-

term interests. We have already seen a sign of this when, 

last November, its people rejected further immigration 

restrictions. 

Switzerland is finding it increasingly difficult to chart its own 

course tied to the world’s largest economic bloc. Ultimately, 

it will have to decide between prosperity – so dependent on 

the Single Market – and its desire to limit migrant arrivals. A 

Britain outside the EU would face similar difficulties in trying 

to have its cake and eat it.

The Swiss deal

Source:


KPMG Brexit report 2015

(1)


EUROPEAN COMMISSION: 

http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/docs/2006/september/tradoc_113429.pdf

(2)

http://www.etui.org/fr/Actualites/Swiss-immigration-referendum-challenges-EU-

freedom-of-labour

UK

Norway

Switzerland

Population 

(Eurostat)

64,233,248 5,109,056

8,136,689

GDP (€billion) 

(Eurostat UK)

2,217.9


377.2

516.2


per capita (€000)

34,529


73,830

63,441


EU contribution (€million) 

(Eurostat)

10,800

296


450

per capita (€)

168

58 55

EU Member

European Free Trade 

Agreement (Norway, 

Switzerland)

 

European Economic Area

60

%

OF SWITZERLAND’S

EXPORTS GO TO 

THE EU

(2)


18

The UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space Industry and the EU

18

The UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space Industry and the EU



The UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space Industry and the EU

19

There has been much debate thus far around the open 

borders aspects of the EU and the implications for migration. 

What is clear from the survey and interviews with a number 

of pan European businesses is that these open borders 

provide a competitive advantage in terms of creating a 

mobile workforce where skills can be accessed at a 

European level and deployed where the demand exists. 

Additionally within the UK there is a well documented skills 

shortage when it comes to skilled engineering resource. 

Many UK companies have sought to address this skills 

shortage through accessing graduates and engineers from 

across the EU, thereby increasing the pool of skilled labour 

that mirrors the global nature of the industry. What is less 

well known is that many UK corporates have sent their UK 

staff abroad to work in their facilities in the EU. In 2014, ADS 

estimates that just over 16,000 employees in its four sectors 

were working for their companies in the EU. British workers 

are able to access such opportunities because of the 

freedom of mobility and limited administration attached to 

such recruitment within the EU. During the interviews, 

several companies noted that the time taken to transfer 

British staff to an EU office was a fraction of the time and 

administrative burden of bringing in non-EU staff. Accessing 

such labour is made more attractive through the freedom of 

mobility and limited administration attached to such 

recruitment. It also provides a diversity of resource which 

mirrors the global nature of the industry. 

When considering the question of open borders and mobility 

it is therefore important to consider the benefits this brings 

to the UK, both as an attractive place to invest and in 

relieving the skills shortage which would otherwise be a 

limiting factor in the industrial recovery. 

PEOPLE AND SKILLS

The importance of mobility in a cross-border supply chain

5

% OF EMPLOYEES IN 

ADS’ SECTORS 

ARE CURRENTLY 

LOCATED IN THE EU

Airbus case study

Airbus employs 16,000 people in the UK 

and its £400 million investment in the wing 

assembly factory in Broughton reflects the importance of 

the UK to the company. 

Airbus epitomises the integrated supply chain that exists 

within the aerospace industry and the benefits of close 

collaboration across borders. The EU has enabled Airbus to 

access skilled resource across its European footprint and to 

then deploy that resource where it is most required at any 

point in time. This mobility is instrumental to its operating 

model and demonstrates the benefit of an EU dominated 

supply chain. At any one time Airbus will have a large 

proportion of UK workers based in France and Germany 

and vice versa. 

A UK exit from the EU would potentially adversely impact 

such mobility and put the UK sites at a disadvantage to EU 

located facilities.

The nature of defence programmes requires a  high proportion of employees to be UK  nationals. The impact of an EU exit would  reduce the pool of engineers and may lead to  distribution across other sectors and increased  costs. People believe that quotas are needed,  industry does not.” 

Foreign owned UK defence company

Source:


ADS member survey

20

The UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space Industry and the EU

Source:

Ministry of Defence website Open Government Licence v3.0

20

The UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space Industry and the EU



The UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space Industry and the EU

21

UK space policy, as managed by the UK Space Agency, is 

closely interwoven with European and international initiatives 

taken forward in other forums such as the European Space 

Agency (ESA), which is a non-EU body. Although ESA and 

EU space funding are separate, they do coordinate, 

particularly to align EU research funding with ESA technology 

priorities. 

In the area of space projects, the EU has responsibility for 

funding and delivering major programmes on satellite 

navigation (Galileo) and environmental monitoring (known as 

Copernicus). UK companies have won contracts worth more 

than €600 million since these programmes began in 2003.

Overall, the UK has been remarkably successful in winning 

EU Framework funding for space R&D in the UK. In the 

latest call for space projects under FP7 around 80% of 

successful bids include a UK partner and around 24% are led 

by one. The total investment secured by these partners is 

approximately €29 million, or 23% of the available budget for 

the call.

The total funding allocated to EU space activities by its 28 

member countries is approximately €11 billion for the period 

2014-2021. Based on the UK’s success in FP7, UK 

companies could receive over €2.5 billion in additional 

funding for space R&D in the UK – if we stay in the EU. 

Membership of the EU ensures the UK has access to, and 

indeed can lead, some of the EU’s biggest space 

programmes, such as the Galileo GPD programme.

In addition, in 2014/15, the UK committed an extra 

£200 million for Europe’s space programmes. This 

contribution helped the UK gain overall leadership in 

developing the pan-European ExoMars rover. The additional 

commitment to the European programme ensured the 

complete design, final integration and testing would be in the 

UK instead of Italy. 

Similarly, the UK’s increased investment in EU space 

programmes directly helped Airbus Defence and Space win a 

£134 million contract to develop instruments for the next 

generation of weather satellites in 2013. 

And although the UK only contributes about 9.9% of the total 

ESA budget, the Rosetta Mission had 10 UK industrial 

partners, which made up 20% of the total number of 

companies involved across Europe.

If the UK were to leave the EU, it is likely we would retain 

access to ESA programmes as an associate member, similar 

to the position Canada enjoys now. 

The UK Space Agency, however, plays a critical role in 

ensuring that EU funding is used in line with UK objectives 

and that UK companies and institutions can compete fairly 

for opportunities. The Agency holds the Commission to 

account for the management of the EU space programmes 

and when discussing new European legislation, the Agency 

leads the negotiations on behalf of the UK.

INNOVATION IN SPACE

The UK's leading role in EU space R&D

80

% OF EU SPACE 

FUNDING BENEFITS

THE UK


UK stands to gain

in EU space R&D 

funding by 2021 by 

staying in the EU

£2.5

bn


22

The UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space Industry and the EU

22

The UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space Industry and the EU

The UK is home to Europe's largest Aerospace industry, but 

trails France and Germany when it comes to funding 

allocation from the EU. 

Feedback from members surveyed and interviewed 

suggests that this anomaly is as much to do with the support 

provided in the UK to access such funding as to the 

availability of it and is one of the clear calls for reform 

identified by members. 

Punching our weight in R&D funding?

The EU is an important source of funding for Research & 

Development and innovation, particularly as individual 

government budgets decline. The EU uses funding 

competitions called Framework Programmes to provide 

research grants to projects in all sectors across Europe. The 

seventh Framework Programme (FP7) ran from 2007-2013 

and awarded almost €50bn worth of R&D grants. In 

2007-2012 (the most recent year we have comparable data 

for countries across the EU), the UK won around 14% (or 

€4.7bn) of the total €33bn funding available to all sectors of 

the UK economy, from aerospace and security to social 

sciences and health research. Over the same period, 

Germany won 17% (or €5.5bn) of funding, outperforming the 

UK by €0.8bn in additional R&D funding for their economy. 

Looking at aerospace and security, there is further scope to 

gain additional R&D funding for the UK. In Germany received 

19% (or €190m) of the Aviation R&D funding between 2007-

2012, whereas the UK won just 11.6% (or €116m) in R&D 

funding, a gap of almost €75m. The French also do better 

than UK, securing 16.5% (or €165m) for their sector. 

Similarly in the Security sector, the UK does well in terms of 

winning funding, but did second best (behind Germany) in 

both participation rates and funding received. On average the 

UK won 12.5% (or €95m) of the €760m in security funding 

on offer between 2011-2013. The benefit to the UK could be 

even higher if the UK received German levels of funding. 

What is clear is that, while the UK is successful in winning 

R&D funding from the EU, we do not do as well as our 

continental cousins in gaining as much as we could. As the 

Space sector discussion shows, by engaging more with 

Europe on its R&D strategy, the UK could secure even 

greater levels of funding worth almost €3bn to the UK by the 

end of the decade. 

FUNDING

Access to EU funding is benefiting UK businesses

19%

16%


12%

53%


France

Germany


UK

Other


Source:

ADS; Aerospace Technology Institute

Aviation 

funding 

allocations 

(FP7)

[Source: Ministry of Defence website Open Government Licence v3.0



The UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space Industry and the EU

23

An EU exit would not give the UK freedom from EU 

regulations. Taking the example of Norway, as part of 

the European Economic Area it has had to systematically 

apply more than 10,000 EU legal acts without any ability 

to influence them. 

Influence on global standards

As a member of the European Union, the UK has significant 

influence in the setting of Aviation & Aerospace standards 

and regulations, at both a global and regional level.

Alongside the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the 

European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) is one of the main 

agencies which drives the new development of safety 

regulations. As an EU member, the UK has voting rights on 

EASA’s decision making body, the EASA Management Board 

– ensuring it is able to help influence regulatory 

developments which protect and support the views of the 

UK government and industry. By leaving the EU, the UK 

would have to follow the same European safety 

regulations outlined by EASA, but would lose the ability to 

shape their development.

The UK also has a national seat on the governing Council of 

ICAO – the UN body which helps to set global standards and 

recommendations in the field of civil aviation. Whilst the UK 

would still retain its place on the ICAO Council in the event 

of an EU exit, its ability to influence global standards would 

also diminish – as it would lose its status as a powerful 

member of EASA, where these global recommendations are 

then adopted.

Gold plated regulations

Feedback from certain ADS members was that the UK needs 

to look at how it interprets and applies EU regulations. Many 

UK businesses had operations across the EU and 

experienced first hand that the interpretation of the same EU 

regulations varied significantly from country to country. In a 

number of cases the UK’s interpretation was more onerous 

on industry than other countries: the gold plating effect. 

EU REGULATORY DEVELOPMENTS 

Influencing global and EU regulations

Engaging more in global regulatory development

The UK and the EU are in a strong position to continue to 

set global regulations and standards in Aerospace 

manufacturing, and partner with China to ensure their 

industry develops safely. However, the European Aviation 

Safety Agency has lost ground to the Federal Aviation 

Administration in partnering with COMAC – despite 

COMAC seeking EASA engagement. A greater UK 

strategic approach to ensure EASA is working with China 

to develop certification standards, alongside further 

engagement in setting global standards for potential new 

UK technology development, will be required in the 

medium-long term. Europe wants to hear the UK’s voice on  standards and regulations. It often brings a  balance of perspective to discussions.“

Large UK-based manufacturer

There is a need for the UK to influence reform  and therefore it is important for the UK to be in  the EU. If the UK is out of the EU then they  cannot help our business.”

North American manufacturer with EU operations



24

The UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space Industry and the EU

The Norwegian model has been raised by EU sceptics as 

evidence of the ability of the UK to successfully operate 

outside the EU without any adverse impact on trading (80% 

of exports being to the EU). 

What is less publicised is that Norway has had to accept 

both financial costs and curbs on its sovereignty in order to 

maintain this trading relationship. 

Whilst Norway has the right to oppose some regulations, in 

practice it is loath to upset its largest trading partner such 

that in reality Norwegian politicians have consented to 

almost all regulations arising from Brussels. 

Norway has implemented thousands of EU regulations since 

it signed the latest trade agreement in 1994, despite the fact 

that Oslo has no direct influence over the content of this 

legislation as a non-member. This democratic deficit is the 

price of greater autonomy. 

The latest negotiations over Norway’s financial contribution 

to the EU highlight this point. Norway is the eighth largest 

contributor to the EU on a per capita basis – 1.8 billion

(1) 


euros between 2009 and 2014. Norway has little choice but 

to accept EU demands to raise contributions again, given 

how vital the Single Market is for their exports, especially of 

oil and fish.

In many aspects Norway is virtually an EU member. Norway 

and the EU cooperate on police, defence and border issues 

and Norway takes part in all EU research programmes and 

most education projects. Norway is also part of the 

Schengen Area, so in that respect, even more integrated 

than the UK in terms of the free movement of people, and 

much of the UK debate over immigration has a resonance.

Opinion polls show Norwegians do not want to join the EU 

but are happy remaining tied to the EU – despite the 

democratic deficit that involves. Britain, with 12 times the 

population and a much larger economy, would likely have 

more influence in Brussels, but fundamentally it would face 

the same trade-off as Norway. The Aerospace, Defence, 

Space and Security industries would need to comply with the 

majority of EU regulations in order to trade with the EU, as 

per Norway. Under the Norwegian model however there 

would be no formal mechanism for influencing such 

regulations and the ability to create a European operating 

model that is competitive on the global stage. This is critical 

in the sectors represented by ADS as the success of these 

sectors is intrinsically linked to the overall success on the 

global stage of companies such as Airbus. 

The Norway model

Norway benefits from its close relationship with the European Union: companies sell into the 

Single Market even though they remain outside its borders. It is one thing to have the legal right  to impose tariffs, but quite another to  exercise that right”

Source:


KPMG Brexit report 2015

(1)


http://www.eu-norway.org/eu/Financial-contribution/#.VOxmYfmsVAA

(2)


EUROPEAN COMMISSION: 

http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/docs/2006/september/tradoc_113429.pdf

80

% TO THE EU

(2)

The UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space Industry and the EU

25

The results of the ADS membership survey support 

continued membership of the EU, but there is a clear call 

for a change in the relationship in a number of areas, the 

top 3 being:

1.

Increasing EU funding for UK firms to invest in research, 

development and skills

2.

Greater UK engagement in EU decision making; and 

3.

UK to work within the EU to make it more efficient.

Increased engagement and influence for positive change 

These themes resonate strongly with the Norwegian 

experience noted on page 23. The majority of ADS members 

are operating in global markets with global regulation. In 

common with other export led industries such as automotive 

these regulations will continue to apply irrespective of the 

UK’s continued membership of the EU. 

The clear message from the ADS membership is therefore 

that the UK needs to use its positon within the EU to address 

matters which have a direct impact on UK industry and 

services. Within the aerospace and defence sectors the UK 

has a leading position along with France and Germany. 

Through its membership of the EU the UK therefore has the 

opportunity to proactively support UK industry and to provide 

an effective balance to French and German influence.

Whilst the previous page refers to specific examples where 

the UK has used its influence, there was clear feedback from 

members that, both through Westminster Government and 

MEPs in Brussels, the UK could do more to proactively 

support the industry. This includes seeking to simplify the 

interpretation of EU regulation and removing the UK’s gold 

plated approach to implementing regulations. 

Increased EU funding 

An area of change advocated by the members surveyed was 

a need for increased access to EU funding. What became 

apparent with further investigation however is that the 

infrastructure put in place across the UK to support both the 

understanding and application for EU funding varied 

significantly. As part of the overall review of EU membership 

it is therefore important to ensure that UK government looks 

at the support put in place to maximise the ability of UK 

industry to access the EU funding available.

ADS MEMBERS CALL FOR CHANGE

Clear call for changing our relationship with the EU

“The aerospace industry in the UK is  operating on a global stage and membership  of the EU gives it the opportunity to  participate in decision making, including the  setting of regulation, which will impact the  industry, irrespective of our EU membership.”

Nigel Stein, CEO GKN plc.

20%


26%

24%


33%

42%


40%

38%


41%

40%


44%

35%


28%

32%


38%

21%


10%

18%


15%

13%


11%

12%


9%

10%


6%

7%

8%

8%

5%

9%

14%

9%

10%

9%

9%

7%

Harmonisation of standards across the EU and internationally

Build alliances within EU to deliver a deregulation agenda

Negotiating trade treaties outside the EU

Boosting trade within the EU

Work within EU to ensure more effiecnt and cost effective EU

governance/institutions

UK government and officials to become more engaged in EU

decision making

Increase EU funding for UK companies' investment in R&D and skills

Very important

Fairly important

Not very important

Not at all important

Don't know

Source:

ADS/GfK NOP Industry Intelligence 2015



26

The UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space Industry and the EU

ADS priorities for change

1.

Adopt an Industrial Strategy approach to support growth 

and competitiveness. The EU should develop a positive, 

proactive economic agenda that looks at how to work 

with Member States to enhance the global 

competitiveness of the Single Market. Immediate 

priorities could include:

a.

Completing key trade deals and opening up new trade 

opportunities for business.

b.

Increasing funding for Innovation, Skills and 

Infrastructure so that companies can be globally 

competitive innovators and exporters in their own 

right.

c. Rethinking its approach to regulation to ensure it 

accounts for the principles of competitiveness, 

proportionality and subsidiarity in either creating or 

removing regulation.

2.

ADS members want the UK to engage more in EU 

decision making. This could take the form of a detailed 

engagement strategy, that sets out how the machinery of 

Government in the UK can proactively engage on UK 

policy priorities in Brussels, and plans to slow the long 

decline in the number of UK nationals in the staff of the 

European Commission. It could also look at how the UK 

Parliament could engage with and debate on EU issues, 

which would allow the UK to improve links with other 

parliaments and ensure the UK can lead a coalition to 

push back against any concerning legislation.

3.

The UK should ensure it engages early on future R&D 

funding decisions. In 2016, the EU will begin reviewing 

the effectiveness of current and future R&D funding 

streams. Other countries are already planning how they 

can boost funding for their companies. The UK should 

begin planning now to ensure more funding comes to 

British businesses and that there is greater funding for a 

pipeline of innovations, that funding is market driven, and 

that funding rules continue to protect IP.

26

The UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space Industry and the EU



[Source: Ministry of Defence website Open Government Licence v3.0

The UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space Industry and the EU

27

28

The UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and Space Industry and the EU

The sectors represented by ADS play an integral part in the 

UK’s focus on export driven

,

value


-

added engineering and 

services. 

The EU provides a significant market for ADS members and 

will continue to do so for the long term. Whilst end demand 

may increasingly be driven by the Far East, Middle East and 

Latin America

,

the majority of UK businesses will access this 

through relationships that exist with their customers across 

Europe. 


In the majority of cases UK companies are often key 

suppliers, providing a lot of the components, critical 

elements and sub-systems into Europe’s supply chain.

They are not necessarily the big brand final producers – the 

likes of Airbus and Finmeccanica – and as they are not 

always the only potential supplier, they are vulnerable to 

substitution. As such it is important that the UK is seen as an 

attractive location to invest. The key message from those 

overseas investors interviewed is that the UK, through its 

membership of the EU and the work of government/industry 

bodies such as the Aerospace Growth Partnership, has made 

the UK an attractive proposition and one which has a lead on 

many of its overseas rivals. The benefits from EU membership 

include free trade, movement of skilled resource and ability 

to influence global regulations. Underpinning this is the 

stability and certainty required when making long term 

investment decisions. 

Whilst an exit from the EU would not necessarily result in 

less favourable conditions, there is a risk that it introduces a 

degree of uncertainty which would negatively impact the 

UK position. 

Based on the survey there is a concern that UK companies 

may miss out on the cream of European engineering talent 

because of restrictions on labour movement or suffer from a 

shortage of investment capital as Britain becomes a far less 

attractive destination for overseas investors. OEMs could 

perhaps favour the simplicity and flexibility of an EU-supply 

base rather than dealing with the potential complexities of a 

company based outside the EU.

In the long term, more EU-based alternatives would emerge. 

As buyers churned their suppliers, UK firms might become 

more marginalised. The integration of supply chains is a 

double-edged sword – our manufacturers are not 

indispensable.

The referendum does however bring the opportunity for the 

UK to more proactively engage with Europe. Within the 

aerospace industry the UK, France and Germany are key 

players not just across Europe but the globe. What is clear 

from respondents is that the UK could do more through its 

membership of the EU to support the industry, and ensure 

that the country plays a role in shaping regulation which 

would not be possible as a standalone nation. 

KPMG encourages an open and informed debate on 

EU membership and we believe that surveys such as this 

facilitate such discussion.  British companies might miss out on the cream  of European engineering because of restrictions  on labour movement.”

GLYNN BELLAMY

73% of the ADS respondents to the survey believed that membership of the EU had 

a positive impact on their business. This is not unexpected given the global nature of 

the aerospace, defence, security and space industries – EU membership being seen 

as supportive of trade to a major sales region. There is also an acceptance that the 

UK will be subject to the majority of regulations, irrespective of EU membership. 

CLOSING REMARKS

The information contained herein is of a general nature and is not intended to address the circumstances of any 

particular individual or entity. Although we endeavour to provide accurate and timely information, there can be 

no guarantee that such information is accurate as of the date it is received or that it will continue to be accurate 

in the future. No one should act on such information without appropriate professional advice after a thorough 

examination of the particular situation.

© 2015 KPMG LLP, a UK limited liability partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent 

member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights 

reserved. Printed in the United Kingdom. 

The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG 

International.

Produced by Create Graphics | CRT039856

Key contacts

Paul Everitt

Chief Executive

ADS


T: 

+44 (0) 20 7091 4502

E: 

paul.everitt@adsgroup.org.uk

Glynn Bellamy

Partner, UK Head of Aerospace

KPMG


T: 

+44 (0) 121 609 6170

E: 

glynn.bellamy@kpmg.co.uk

Matthew Willies

Manager, Aerospace team

KPMG


T: 

+44 (0) 121 609 6181

E: 

matthew.willies@kpmg.co.uk

Document Outline

  • The UK
  • Slide Number 2
  • Slide Number 3
  • Slide Number 4
  • Slide Number 5
  • UK Aerospace, Defence, Security and SPACE Sector Snapshot
  •  
  •  
  • Slide Number 9
  • The ADS membership contribute to wealth creation and employment across the country
  • Slide Number 11
  • ADS members survey Results
  • Slide Number 13
  • Foreign Direct Investment
  •  
  • Free trade with the EU
  • Slide Number 17
  • Slide Number 18
  •  
  • People and skills
  •  
  • Innovation in space
  • funding
  • EU regulatory developments 
  • Slide Number 25
  • ADS members CALL FOR CHANGE
  •  
  • Slide Number 28
  •  
  • Slide Number 30


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


toms-such-as-social-and.html

tomskij-gosudarstvennij.html

ton-otkritiya-mitralnogo.html

tongsojugdan-donmush-don-.html

toni-serdca---literatura.html