1 ... 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 ... 23

The Poincaré Conjecture Clay Research Conference Resolution of the Poincaré Conjecture Institut Henri Poincaré Paris, France, June 8–9, 2010 - bet 12

bet12/23
Sana08.07.2018
Hajmi3.97 Kb.
“algebraic cycle” , these sums have zero algebraic boundaries, which is equivalent
to c
(C
alg
) = 0 for every Z-cocycle c cohomologous to zero (see Section 2).
But this is exactly the same as our generic cycles C
geo
in the i-skeleton X
i
of
X and, tautologically, C
alg
taut
↦ C
geo
gives us a homomorphism from the algebraic
homology to our geometric one.

MANIFOLDS
95
On the other hand, an
(i+j)-simplex minus its center can be radially homotoped
to its boundary. Then the obvious reverse induction on skeleta of the triangulation
shows that the space X minus a subset Σ
⊂ X of codimension i+1 can be homotoped
to the i-skeleton X
i
⊂ X.
Since every generic i-cycle C misses Σ it can be homotoped to X
i
where the
resulting map, say f
∶ C → X
i
, sends C to an algebraic cycle.
At this point, the equivalence of the two definitions becomes apparent, where,
observe, the argument applies to all cellular spaces X with piece-wise linear attach-
ing maps.
The usual definition of homology of such an X amounts to working with all
i-cycles contained in X
i
and with
(i + 1)-plaques in X
i
+1
. In this case the group of
i-cycles becomes a subspace of the group spanned by the i-cells, which shows, for
example, that the rank of H
i
(X) does not exceed the number of i-cells in X
i
.
We return to generic geometric cycles and observe that if X is a non-compact
manifold, one may drop “compact” in the definition of these cycles. The resulting
group is denoted H
1
(X, ∂

). If X is compact with boundary, then this group of
the interior of X is called the relative homology group H
i
(X, ∂(X)). (The ordinary
homology groups of this interior are canonically isomorphic to those of X.)
Intersection Ring. The intersection of cycles in general position in a smooth
manifold X defines a multiplicative structure on the homology of an n-manifold X,
denoted
[C
1
] ⋅ [C
2
] = [C
1
] ∩ [C
2
] = [C
1
∩ C
2
] ∈ H
n
−(i+j)
(X)
for
[C
1
] ∈ H
n
−i
(X) and [C
2
] ∈ H
n
−j
(X),
where
[C]∩[C] is defined by intersecting C ⊂ X with its small generic perturbation
C

⊂ X.
(Here genericity is most useful: intersection is painful for simplicial cycles con-
fined to their respective skeleta of a triangulation. On the other hand, if X is a
not a manifold one may adjust the definition of cycles to the local topology of the
singular part of X and arrive at what is called the intersection homology.)
It is obvious that the intersection is respected by f
!
for proper maps f , but
not for f

. The former implies. in particular, that this product is invariant under
oriented (i.e. of degrees
+1) homotopy equivalences between closed equidimensional
manifolds. (But X
× R, which is homotopy equivalent to X has trivial intersection
ring, whichever is the ring of X.)
Also
notice
that
the
intersection
of
cycles
of
odd
codimen-
sions is anti-commutative and if one of the two has even codimension it is com-
mutative.
The intersection of two cycles of complementary dimensions is a 0-cycle, the
total
Z-weight of which makes sense if X is oriented; it is called the intersection
index of the cycles.
Also observe that the intersection between C
1
and C
2
equals the intersection
of C
1
× C
2
with the diagonal X
diag
⊂ X × X.
Example
(a). The intersection ring of the complex projective space
CP
k
is
multiplicatively generated by the homology class of the hyperplane,
[CP
k
−1
] ∈
H
2k
−2
(CP
k
), with the only relation [CP
k
−1
]
k
+1
= 0 and where, obviously, [CP
k
−i
]⋅
[CP
k
−j
] = [CP
k
−(i+j)
].

96
MIKHAIL GROMOV
The only point which needs checking here is that the homology class
[CP
i
]
(additively) generates H
i
(CP
k
), which is seen by observing that CP
i
+1
∖ CP
i
, i
=
0, 1, ..., k
− 1, is an open (2i + 2)-cell, i.e. the open topological ball B
2i
+2
op
(where the
cell attaching map ∂
(B
2i
+2
) = S
2i
+1
→ CP
i
is the quotient map S
2i
+1
→ S
2i
+1
/T =
CP
i
+1
for the obvious action of the multiplicative group
T of the complex numbers
with norm 1 on S
2i
+1
⊂ C
2i
+1
).
Example
(b). The intersection ring of the n-torus is isomorphic to the ex-
terior algebra on n-generators, i.e. the only relations between the multiplicative
generators h
i
∈ H
n
−1
(T
n
) are h
i
h
j
= −h
j
h
i
, where h
i
are the homology classes of
the n coordinate subtori
T
n
−1
i
⊂ T
n
.
This follows from the K´’unneth formula below, but can be also proved directly
with the obvious cell decomposition of
T
n
into 2
n
cells.
The intersection ring structure immensely enriches homology. Additively, H

=

i
H
i
is just a graded Abelian group – the most primitive algebraic object (if finitely
generated) – fully characterized by simple numerical invariants: the rank and the
orders of their cyclic factors.
But the ring structure, say on H
n
−2
of an n-manifold X, for n
= 2d defines
a symmetric d-form, on H
n
−2
= H
n
−2
(X) which is, a polynomial of degree d in r
variables with integer coefficients for r
= rank(H
n
−2
). All number theory in the
world cannot classify these for d
≥ 3 (to be certain, for d ≥ 4).
One can also intersect non-compact cycles, where an intersection of a compact
C
1
with a non-compact C
2
is compact; this defines the intersection pairing
H
n
−i
(X) ⊗ H
n
−j
(X, ∂

)

→ H
n
−(i+j)
(X).
Finally notice that generic 0 cycles C in X are finite sets of points x
∈ X with
the “orientation” signs
±1 attached to each x in C, where the sum of these ±1 is
called the index of C. If X is connected, then ind
(C) = 0 if and only if [C] = 0.
Thom Isomorphism. Let p
∶ V → X be a fiber-wise oriented smooth (which is
unnecessary)
R
N
-bundle over X, where X
⊂ V is embedded as the zero section and
let V

be Thom space of V . Then there are two natural homology homomorphisms.
Intersection.
∩ ∶ H
i
+N
(V

) → H
i
(X). This is defined by inter-
secting generic
(i + N)-cycles in V

with X.
Thom Suspension.
S

∶ H
i
(X) → H
i
(V

), where every cycle
C
⊂ X goes to the Thom space of the restriction of V to C, i.e.
C
↦ (p
−1
(C))

⊂ V

.
These
∩ and S

are mutually reciprocal. Indeed
(∩ ○ S

)(C) = C for all C ⊂ X and
also
(S

○ ∩)(C

) ∼ C

for all cycles C

in V

where the homology is established by
the fiberwise radial homotopy of C

in V

⊃ V , which fixes ● and move each v ∈ V
by v
↦ tv. Clearly, tC

→ (S

○ ∩)(C

) as t → ∞ for all generic cycles C

in V

.
Thus we arrive at the Thom isomorphism
H
i
(X) ↔ H
i
+N
(V

).
Similarly we see that
The Thom space of every
R
N
-bundle V
→ X is (N−1)-connected,
i.e. π
j
(V

) = 0 for j = 1, 2, ...N − 1.

MANIFOLDS
97
Indeed, a generic j-sphere S
j
→ V

with j
< N does not intersect X ⊂ V , where
X is embedded into V by the zero section. Therefore, this sphere radially (in the
fibers of V ) contracts to
● ∈ V

.
Euler Class. Let f
∶ X → B be a fibration with R
2k
-fibers over a smooth
closed oriented manifold B. Then the intersection indices of 2k-cycles in B with
B
⊂ X, embedded as the zero section, defines an integer cohomology class, i.e. a
homomorphism (additive map) e
∶ H
2k
(B) → Z ⊂ Q, called the Euler class of the
fibration. (In fact, one does not need B to be a manifold for this definition.)
Observe that the Euler number vanishes if and only if the homology projection
homomorphism
0
f
∗2k
∶ H
2k
(V ∖ B; Q) → H
2k
(B; Q) is surjective, where B ⊂ X is
embedded by the zero section b
↦ 0
b
∈ R
k
b
and
0
f
∶ V ∖ B → B is the restriction of
the map (projection) f to V
∖ B.
Moreover, it is easy to see that the ideal in H

(B) generated by the Euler
class (for the
⌣-ring structure on cohomology defined later in this section) equals
the kernel of the cohomology homomorphism
0
f

∶ H

(B) → H

(V ∖ B).
If B is a closed connected oriented manifold, then e
[B] is called the Euler
number of X
→ B also denoted e.
In other words, the number e equals the self-intersection index of B
⊂ X. Since
the intersection pairing is symmetric on H
2k
the sign of the Euler number does not
depend on the orientation of B, but it does depend on the orientation of X.
Also notice that if X is embedded into a larger 4k-manifold X

⊃ X then the
self-intersection index of B in X

equals that in X.
If X equals the tangent bundle T
(B) then X is canonically oriented (even if B
is non-orientable) and the Euler number is non-ambiguously defined and it equals
the self-intersection number of the diagonal X
diag
⊂ X × X.
Theorem
(Poincar´
e-Hopf Formula). The Euler number e of the tangent bundle
T
(B) of every closed oriented 2k-manifold B satisfies
e
= χ(B) =

i
=0,1,...2k
rank
(H
i
(B; Q)).
(If n
= dim(B) is odd, then ∑
i
=0,1,...n
rank
(H
i
(B; Q)) = 0 by the Poincar´e duality.)
It is hard the believe this may be true! A single cycle (let it be the fundamental
one) knows something about all of the homology of B.
The most transparent proof of this formula is, probably, via the Morse theory
(known to Poincar´
e) and it hardly can be called “trivial”.
A more algebraic proof follows from the K´’unneth formula (see below) and
an expression of the class
[X
diag
] ∈ H
2k
(X × X) in terms of the intersection ring
structure in H

(X).
The Euler number can be also defined for connected non-orientable B as follows.
Take the canonical oriented double covering ˜
B
→ B, where each point ˜b ∈ ˜
B over
b
∈ B is represented as b + an orientation of B near b. Let the bundle ˜
X
→ ˜
B be
induced from X by the covering map ˜
B
→ B, i.e. this ˜
X is the obvious double
covering of X corresponding to ˜
B
→ B. Finally, set e(X) = e( ˜
X
)/2.
The Poincar´
e-Hopf formula for non-orientable 2k-manifolds B follows from the
orientable case by the multiplicativity of the Euler characteristic χ which is valid
for all compact triangulated spaces B,
an l-sheeted covering ˜
B
→ B has χ( ˜
B
) = l ⋅ χ(B).

98
MIKHAIL GROMOV
If the homology is defined via a triangulation of B, then χ
(B) equals the alternating
sum

i
(−1)
i
N

i
) of the numbers of i-simplices by straightforward linear algebra
and the multiplicativity follows. But this is not so easy with our geometric cycles.
(If B is a closed manifold, this also follows from the Poincar´
e-Hopf formula and the
obvious multiplicativity of the Euler number for covering maps.)
Theorem
(K´’unneth Theorem). The rational homology of the Cartesian prod-
uct of two spaces equals the graded tensor product of the homologies of the factors.
In fact, the natural homomorphism

i
+j=k
H
i
(X
1
;
Q) ⊗ H
j
(X
2
;
Q) → H
k
(X
1
× X
2
;
Q), k = 0, 1, 2, ...
is an isomorphism. Moreover, if X
1
and X
2
are closed oriented manifolds, this
homomorphism is compatible (if you say it right) with the intersection product.
This is obvious if X
1
and X
2
have cell decompositions such that the numbers of
i-cells in each of them equals the ranks of their respective H
i
. In the general case,
the proof is cumbersome unless you pass to the language of chain complexes where
the difficulty dissolves in linear algebra. (Yet, keeping track of geometric cycles may
be sometimes necessary, e.g. in the algebraic geometry, in the geometry of foliated
cycles and in evaluating the so called filling profiles of products of Riemannian
manifolds.)
Theorem
(Poincar´
e
Q-Duality). Let X be a connected oriented n-manifold.
The intersection index establishes a linear duality between homologies of comple-
mentary dimensions:
H
i
(X; Q) equals the Q-linear dual of H
n
−i
(X, ∂

;
Q).
In other words, the intersection pairing
H
i
(X) ⊗ H
n
−i
(X, ∂

)

→ H
0
(X) = Z
is
Q-faithful: a multiple of a compact i-cycle C is homologous to zero if and only
if its intersection index with every non-compact
(n − i)-cycle in general position
equals zero.
Furthermore, if X equals the interior of a compact manifolds with a boundary,
then a multiple of a non-compact cycle is homologous to zero if and only if its
intersection index with every compact generic cycle of the complementary dimension
equals zero.
Proof of
(H
i
↔ H
n
−i
) for Closed Manifolds X. We, regretfully, break
the symmetry by choosing some smooth triangulation T of X which means this T
is locally as good as a triangulation of
R
n
by affine simplices (see below).
Granted T , assign to each generic i-cycle C
⊂ X the intersection index of C
with every oriented Δ
n
−i
of T and observe that the resulting function c

∶ Δ
n
−i

ind

n
−i
∩ C) is a Z-valued cocycle (see section 2), since the intersection index
of C with every
(n − i)-sphere ∂(Δ
n
−i+1
) equals zero, because these spheres are
homologous to zero in X.
Conversely, given a
Z-cocycle c(Δ
n
−i
) construct an i-cycle C

⊂ X as follows.
Start with
(n − i + 1)-simplices Δ
n
−i+1
and take in each of them a smooth oriented
curve S with the boundary points located at the centers of the
(n − i)-faces of
Δ
n
−i+1
, where S is normal to a face Δ
n
−i
whenever it meets one and such that

MANIFOLDS
99
the intersection index of the (slightly extended across Δ
n
−i
) curve S with Δ
n
−i
equals c

n
−i
). Such a curve, (obviously) exists because the function c is a cocycle.
Observe, that the union of these S over all
(n−i+1)-simplices in the boundary sphere
S
n
−i+1
= ∂Δ
n
−i+2
of every
(n − i + 2)-simplex in T is a closed (disconnected) curve
in S
n
−i+1
, the intersection index of which with every
(n − i)-simplex Δ
n
−i
⊂ S
n
−i+1
equals c

n
−i
) (where this intersection index is evaluated in S
n
−i+1
but not in X).
Then construct by induction on j the (future) intersection C
j

of C

with the
(n−i+j)-skeleton T
n
−i+j
of our triangulation by taking the cone from the center of
each simplex Δ
n
−i+j
⊂ T
n
−i+j
over the intersection of C
j

with the boundary sphere


n
−i+j
).
It is easy to see that the resulting C

is an i-cycle and that the composed maps
C
→ c

→ C

and c
→ C

→ c

define identity homomorphisms H
i
(X) → H
i
(X)
and H
n
−i
(X; Z) → H
n
−i
(X; Z) correspondingly and we arrive at the Poincar´e Z-
isomorphism,
H
i
(X) ↔ H
n
−i
(X; Z).
To complete the proof of the
Q-duality one needs to show that H
j
(X; Z) ⊗ Q
equals the
Q-linear dual of H
j
(X; Q). To do this we represent H
i
(X) by algebraic
Z-cycles ∑
j
k
j
Δ
i
and now, in the realm of algebra, appeal to the linear duality
between homologies of the chain and cochain complexes of T :
the natural pairing between classes h
∈ H
i
(X) and c ∈ H
i
(X; Z),
which we denote
(h, c) ↦ c(h) ∈ Z, establishes, when tensored
with
Q, an isomorphism between H
i
(X; Q) and the Q-linear
dual of H
i
(X; Q)
H
i
(X; Q) ↔ Hom[H
i
(X; Q)] → Q]
for all compact triangulated spaces X.
Corollaries. (a) The non-obvious part of the Poincar´
e duality is the claim
that, for ever
Q-homologically non-trivial cycle C, there is a cycle C

of the com-
plementary dimension, such that the intersection index between C and C

does not
vanish.
But the easy part of the duality is also useful, as it allows one to give a lower
bound on the homology by producing sufficiently many non-trivially intersecting
cycles of complementary dimensions.
For example it shows that closed manifolds are non-contractible (where it re-
duces to the degree argument). Also it implies that the K¨
unneth pairing H

(X; Q)⊗
H

(Y ; Q) → H

(X × Y ; Q) is injective for closed orientable manifolds X.
(b) Let f
∶ X
m
+n
→ Y
n
be a smooth map between closed orientable manifolds
such the homology class of the pullback of a generic point is not homologous to
zero, i.e. 0
≠ [f
−1
(y
0
)] ∈ H
m
(X). Then the homomorphisms f
!i
∶ H
i
(Y ; Q) →
H
i
+m
(X; Q) are injective for all i.
Indeed, every h
∈ H
i
(Y ; Q) different from zero comes with an h

∈ H
n
−i
(Y )
such that the intersection index d between the two is
≠ 0. Since the intersection of
f
!
(h) and f
!
(h

) equals d[f
−1
(y
0
)] none of f
!
(h) and f
!
(h

) equals zero. Conse-
quently/similarly all f
∗j
∶ H
j
(X) → H
j
(Y ) are surjective. For example,
(b1) Equidimensional maps f of positive degrees between closed oriented man-
ifolds are surjective on rational homology.

100
MIKHAIL GROMOV
(b2) Let f
∶ X → Y be a smooth fibration where the fiber is a closed oriented
manifold with non-zero Euler characteristic, e.g. homeomorphic to S
2k
. Then
the fiber is non-homologous to zero, since the Euler class e of the fiberwise tan-
gent bundle, which defined on all of X, does not vanish on f
−1
(y
0
); hence, f

is
surjective.
Recall that the unit tangent bundle fibration X
= UT (S
2k
) → S
2k
= Y with
S
2k
−1
-fibers has H
i
(X; Q) = 0 for 1 ≤ i ≤ 4k −1, since the Euler class of T (S
2k
) does
not vanish; hence; f

vanishes on all H
i
(X; Q), i > 0.
Geometric Cocycles. We gave only a combinatorial definition of cohomology,
but this can be defined more invariantly with geometric i-cocycles c being “gener-
ically locally constant” functions on oriented plaques D such that c
(D) = −c(−D)
for reversing the orientation in D, where c
(D
1
+ D
2
) = c(D
1
) + c(D
2
) and where
the final cocycle condition reads c
(C) = 0 for all i-cycles C which are homologous
to zero. Since every C
∼ 0 decomposes into a sum of small cycles, the condition
c
(C) = 0 needs to be verified only for (arbitrarily) “small cycles” C.
Cocycles are as good as Poincar´
e’s dual cycles for detecting non-triviality of
geometric cycles C: if c
(C) ≠ 0, then, C is non-homologous to zero and also c is
not cohomologous to zero.
If we work with H

(X; R), these cocycles c(D) can be averaged over measures
on the space of smooth self-mapping X
→ X homotopic to the identity. (The aver-
aged cocycles are kind of duals of generic cycles.) Eventually, they can be reduced to
differential forms invariant under a given compact connected automorphism group
of X, that let cohomology return to geometry by the back door.
On Integrality of Cohomology. In view of the above, the rational cohomol-
ogy classes c
∈ H
i
(X; Q) can be defined as homomorphisms c ∶ H
i
(X) → Q. Such
a c is called integer if its image is contained in
Z ⊂ Q. (Non-integrality of cer-
tain classes underlies the existence of nonstandard smooth structures on topological
spheres discovered by Milnor, see Section 6.)
The
Q-duality does not tell you the whole story. For example, the following
simple property of closed n-manifolds X depends on the full homological duality:


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-series-of-the-24.html

the-series-of-the-29.html

the-series-of-the-33.html

the-series-of-the-38.html

the-series-of-the-42.html