1 ... 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

The Poincaré Conjecture Clay Research Conference Resolution of the Poincaré Conjecture Institut Henri Poincaré Paris, France, June 8–9, 2010 - bet 21

bet21/23
Sana08.07.2018
Hajmi3.97 Kb.
singularity can be either forced by the topology or caused by complexity in metric
behavior even if the manifold has simple topology. The latter singularity can occur
along proper subsets of the manifolds, but not the entire manifold. Therefore, one
is led to studying a more general evolution process called Ricci flow with surgery,
which was first introduced by Hamilton for 4-manifolds with positive isotropic cur-
vature. This evolution process is still parametrized by an interval in time, so that
for each t in the interval of definition there is a compact Riemannian 3-manifold
M
t
. But there is a discrete set of times at which the manifolds and metrics undergo
topological and metric discontinuities (surgeries). In each of the complementary
intervals to the singular times, the evolution is the usual Ricci flow, though the
topological type of M
t
changes as t moves from one complementary interval to the
next.
It is crucial for the topological applications that we do surgery only along two
spheres rather than surfaces of higher genus. Surgery along two spheres produces
the connected sum decomposition, which is well-understood topologically, while
surgeries along tori can completely destroy the topology, changing any 3-manifold
into any other. Perelman’s first technical advance is that one needs to do surgeries
only along two spheres. He understood completely the change in topology. More
precisely, he established the following:
Theorem
2.2. Let (M, g
0
) be a closed orientable Riemannian 3-manifold. Then
there is a Ricci flow with surgery (M
t
, g(t)) defined for all t
∈ [0, ∞) with initial
conditions (M, g
0
). The set of discontinuity times for this Ricci flow with surgery
is a discrete subset of [0,
∞). The topological change in the 3-manifold as one
crosses a surgery time is a connected sum decomposition together with removal of
connected components, each of which is diffeomorphic to one of S
2
×S
1
, RP
3
RP
3
,
or a manifold admitting a metric of constant positive curvature.
If M is simply-connected or its fundamental group is not too big, Perelman
showed us in [Perel] why M
t
has to become empty for t sufficiently large, i.e., the
Ricci flow with surgery becomes extinct in finite time. In particular, the Poincar´
e
conjecture follows. One can find detailed proof of this finite extinction in [MT06]
and [CM07].

148
GANG TIAN
To solve Thurston’s Geometrization Conjecture, one needs to study the as-
ymptotic behavior of the above Ricci flow with surgery
1
and to prove a result on
collapsing 3-manifolds with curvature locally bounded from below and with geodesi-
cally convex boundary. A detailed proof of this result on collapsing can be found
in [MT08], [CG09] and [KL10]. Also we should point out that this result on
collapsing of closed 3-manifolds was a weaker version of the main conclusion of
Shioya-Yamaguchi in a series of papers ranging from 2000 to 2005 (see [SY06],
[SY06]). But its proof relies crucially on a hard stability theorem first shown
by Perelman in an unpublished preprint in 1992. In 2007, V. Kapovitch gave an
alternative proof of this stability result. His proof was published in [Ka07].
Let me mention a few crucial ingredients in establishing Theorem 2.2 before
Perelman’s work. First the analytic theory established by R. Hamilton plays a
fundamental role in the proof, particularly, the compactness theorem for Ricci flow.
The second is the Hamilton-Ivey curvature pinching estimate [Ha99]: There is a
function φ with φ(s) = 0 for s
≤ 0 and lim
s
→∞
φ(s) = 0 such that
Rm
≥ −φ(R) R − C
0
,
where R denotes the scalar curvature and C
0
is a constant depending only on the
initial metric. This is only true in dimension 3! The third is the work of Cheeger-
Gromoll et al. in late 60’s on manifolds with non-negative curvature. Also, in
the proof of Theorem 2.2, one needs to use the Harnack-type inequality for Ricci
flow proved by Hamilton which is a non-linear extension of the Harnack-Li-Yau
inequality for the heat equation (see [LY86], [Ha93]).
Perelman’s first technical advance is a new length function
L for Ricci flow.
He called it reduced length. He developed a theory for
L analogous to the theory
for the usual length function on Riemannian manifolds. Using the reduced length,
Perelman defined the reduced volume and proved that the reduced volume is non-
decreasing under the associated backward Ricci flow (backwards in time). This is
the fundamental tool used by Perelman for proving a crucial non-collapsing result.
More precisely, he proved: If g(t) is a solution of Ricci flow on [0, T ) for some T <
∞,
there is a κ > 0 depending only on T and g(0) such that whenever
|Rm(g(t))| ≤ r
−2
on B(x, t, r)
× (t − r
2
, t], Vol(B(x, t, r))
≥ κ r
3
, where B(x, t, r) is the geodesic ball
of g(t) centered at x
∈ M and with radius r.
Together with the curvature pinching estimate and the work on manifolds of
non-negative curvature, this non-collapsing result is used to classify topologically
all the κ-solutions in dimension 3 which characterize finite-time singularity, in par-
ticular, one needs to do surgery only along 2-spheres.
With slight modifications to the domain of integration, one can extend the
definitions and the analysis of the reduced length and the reduced volume as well
as its monotonicity in the context of the Ricci flow with surgery.
Perelman’s second major technical breakthrough is to prove that the region
of big curvature is approximated by a κ-solution. This is fundamental in his ap-
proach towards geometrization or the Poincar´
e conjecture. It implies: there is a
r
0
> 0, which depends on initial metric and is bounded away from zero in any
given time interval, such that all points of scalar curvature
≥ r
−2
0
have canonical
neighborhoods, that is, neighborhoods which can be described in a topologically
and analytically controlled way.
1
In 2012, R. Bamler found and fixed a gap in Section 6.4 of [Perel] which had been missed.

GEOMETRIC ANALYSIS ON 4-MANIFOLDS
149
Theorem 2.2 can be proved by applying these techniques in a wise way.
3. Canonical structure in dimension 4
The situation in dimension 4 and upwards is very different from dimension 2 or
3. The Ricci curvature no longer determines the full curvature tensor, so even if M
admits an Einstein metric, it may not be a quotient of S
4
,
R
4
or H
4
. The simplest
example is
CP
2
which admits a homogeneous Einstein metric, the Fubini-Study
metric, but it is not a quotient space of this form.
What is special in dimension 4? The special feature in dimension 4 is the
occurence of self-duality. It arises because the Lie algebra so(4) can be written as
a direct sum of two so(3), where so(k) denotes the Lie algebra of skew-symmetric
k
× k matrices. More explicitly, this splitting can be described in terms of the
Hodge operator
: Λ
2
R
4
→ Λ
2
R
4
: If e
1
,
· · · , e
4
form an orthonormal basis of
R
4
with respect to the Euclidean inner product, then
2
= Id and
(e
1
∧ e
2
) = e
3
∧ e
4
, (e
1
∧ e
3
) = e
4
∧ e
2
, (e
1
∧ e
4
) = e
2
∧ e
3
Then we have

2
R
4
= Λ
+
R
4
⊕ Λ

R
4
, where Λ
+
R
4
is the self-dual part and Λ

R
4
is the anti-self-dual part according to eigenspaces of
with eigenvalues
±1. Note
that Λ
2
R
k
can be naturally identified with so(k).
The self-dual structure plays a fundamental role in Donaldson’s theory of
smooth 4-manifolds (see [Do86]). The basic building blocks in Donaldson’s theory
are the anti-self-dual solutions, also called instantons, to the Yang-Mills equation.
Many beautiful results were proved by using the moduli of anti-self-dual solutions,
for example, the theorem that a definite intersection form of a smooth simply-
connected 4-manifold is diagnosable over
Z and the construction of Donaldson in-
variants for smooth 4-manifolds. Later, in the middle of 90’s, the Seiberg-Witten
invariants were introduced [Wi94]. The associated Seiberg-Witten equation also
uses the self-dual structure in dimension 4.
In line with my interest, I will concentrate on the metric geometry of 4-
manifolds and its connections to the topology. Given a 4-dimensional Riemannian
manifold (M, g), we have a family of spaces T
p
M with the inner product g
p
(
·, ·)
(p
∈ M). We then have a Hodge operator : Λ
2
M
→ Λ
2
M , which can be charac-
terized by
ϕ
∧ ψ = g(ϕ, ψ) dV
g
,
where ϕ, ψ
∈ Λ
2
M and dV
g
denotes the volume form of g. Accordingly, we have
a decomposition of

2
M into the self-dual part Λ
+
M and the anti-self-dual part
Λ

M , and consequently, we have the following decomposition of the curvature
operator:
Rm =



W
+
+
S
12
Z
Z
W

+
S
12



where W = W
+
+ W

is the Weyl tensor whose vanishing implies that g is locally
conformally flat, Z is the traceless Ricci curvature, that is,
Z = Ric(g)

S
4
g,
and S is the scalar curvature.

150
GANG TIAN
If g is an Einstein metric, then Z = 0, i.e., Rm(g) is self-dual. Another class
of canonical metrics are anti-self-dual.
Definition
3.1. A metric g is anti-self-dual and of constant scalar curvature
if W
+
= 0 and S = constant.
More generally, one can perturb the anti-self-dual equation: we call a metric g
a generalized anti-self-dual metric if there is a section f of S
2
Λ
+
M over M , where
Λ
+
M denotes the self-dual part of Λ
2
M with respect to g, such that f is harmonic
and g satisfies
(3.1)
W
+
= S
· f, S = const.
For simplicity, we often call g an f -asd metric.
If M is a complex surface with complex structure J , there is a natural decompo-
sition Λ
2
M = Λ
−J
M
⊕ Λ
J
M according to anti-J -invariance and J -invariance, i.e.,
Λ
−J
M consists of all ϕ with ϕ
· J = −ϕ and Λ
J
M consists of all ϕ with ϕ
· J = ϕ.
Then we have a section f of the form
f
|
Λ
J
M
=
1
6
Id
and
f
|
Λ
−J
M
=

1
12
Id.

ahler metrics of constant scalar curvature are f -asd for this f since f is parallel
and any K¨
ahler metric has W
+
= S
· f.
The above canonical metrics also impose topological constraints on underly-
ing 4-manifolds.
Recall that the cup product induces a non-degenerate inter-
section form I on H
2
(M,
Z). There is a natural decomposition H
2
(M,
R) =
H
2
+
(M )
⊕ H
2

(M ) induced by the Hodge operator
∗. This decomposition is or-
thogonal with respect to the real form I
R
of I on H
2
(M,
R). A famous theorem
of M. Freedman [Fr82] says that if two simply-connected smooth 4-manifolds have
the same intersection form, then they are homeomorphic to each other.
By the Index Theorem, the signature τ (M ) = dim
R
H
2
+
(M )
− dim
R
H
2

(M ) is
given by
(3.2)
τ (M ) =
1

2
M
(
|W
+
|
2
− |W

|
2
) dV
On the other hand, the Gauss-Bonnet-Chern formula gives
(3.3)
χ(M ) =
1
12π
2
M
(
|W |
2
− |Z|
2
+
S
2
24
) dV,
where χ(M ) denotes the Euler number.
It follows from these: if M admits an Einstein metric, then we have the Hitchin–
Thorpe inequality
|τ(M)| ≤
2
3
χ(M ).
Furthermore, in [Hi74], Hitchin proved that the equality holds if and only if M is
diffeomorphic to K3 surfaces, which include quartic surfaces in
CP
3
.
As a corollary of the Hitchin–Thorpe inequality, we can easily show that
CP
2
k
CP
2
does not have Einstein metrics for k
≥ 9, while it does admit an Einstein
metric for k
≤ 8, see [TY87], [CLW08].
If M is also a complex surface, then there is a stronger Miyaoka–Yau inequality
[Ya77]: τ (M )

1
3
χ(M ). In [Le95], Lebrun extended this inequality and proved
the same inequality for any smooth 4-manifold M which admits an Einstein metric

GEOMETRIC ANALYSIS ON 4-MANIFOLDS
151
and has non-vanishing Seiberg–Witten invariant. This provides an obstruction to
the existence of Einstein metrics. Recently, a new obstruction was given by Ishida
[Is12].
We can state another corollary of the Hitchin–Thorpe inequality: If a simply-
connected spin 4-manifold M is a connected sum of smooth 4-manifolds which are
homeomorphic to Einstein 4-manifolds, then 8 b
2
(M )
≥ −11 τ(M).
Anti-self-dual metrics also impose constraints on M . First the signature τ (M )
has to be non-positive if M admits an anti-self-dual metric. The following theorem
can be easily proved.
Theorem
3.2. If τ (M ) = 0 and M admits an anti-self-dual metric, then M
is locally conformal flat. If M is further simply-connected, then M has to be a
standard 4-sphere.
Basic question on canonical metrics include existence, uniqueness, compactness
and regularity theory for related equations.
4. Ricci flow on 4-manifolds
The Ricci flow (2.1) provides a way of constructing Einstein metrics on 4-
manifolds. However, unlike the 2- or 3-dimensional cases, it is much more difficult
to study the flow. For instance, we do not have an analogue of the Hamilton-Ivey
pinching estimate for curvature. Even the static solutions of the flow, i.e., the Ein-
stein metrics, may develop singularities, which never happens in lower dimensions.
If the initial metric g
0
has positive curvature operator, Hamilton proved in
[Ha86] that after normalizing the volume, the flow has a global solution which
converges to a metric of constant sectional curvature. If g
0
has positive isotropic
curvature, so does g(t) along the Ricci flow. The structure of such 4-manifolds can
be analyzed by using the Ricci flow (cf. [Ha97],[CZ06]). In general, not much is
known about the flow in dimension 4 except for K¨
ahler surfaces.
The Ricci flow has the following property: if the initial metric g
0
is K¨
ahler, so
is g(t) along the Ricci flow. In this case, we understand completely the singularity
formation. Let us give a brief tour of what we know about Ricci flow on K¨
ahler
surfaces.
Assume that (M, g
0
) is a compact K¨
ahler surface with K¨
ahler form ω
0
. It is
proved in [TZ06] that (2.1) has a maximal solution g(t) for t
∈ [0, T ), where
T = sup
 [ω
0
]
− tc
1
(M ) > 0
.
Moreover, each g(t) is K¨
ahler with the K¨
ahler class [ω
0
]
− tc
1
(M ).
If M contains a holomorphic sphere C with c
1
(M )([C]) > 0, then this implies
that [ω
0
]
− tc
1
(M ) ceases to be a K¨
ahler class for some
T
≤ [ω
0
]([C])/c
1
(M )([C]) <
∞,
so (2.1) develops singularity at T . If C is irreducible, c
1
(M )([C]) > 0 is the same
as saying that the self-intersection of C is greater than
−2. It turns out that those
holomorphic curves are the only reason for the finite-time singularity of (2.1) on

ahler surfaces; this is because [ω
0
]
− tc
1
(M ) > 0 for any t
≥ 0 if no such curves
exist. As t tends to T , (M, g(t)) collapses to a point or a Riemann surface or
contracts certain holomorphic spheres of self-intersection number
−1. In the first
case, [ω
0
] = T c
1
(M ) and consequently M is a del Pezzo surface.

152
GANG TIAN
In the second case, M has to be a ruled surface over a Riemann surface Σ
and g(t) converges to a (1,1)-current g
T
on Σ in the weak sense, possibly in the
Gromov–Hausdorff topology. Then it can be proved that there is a Ricci flow g(t)
(t > T ) on Σ with lim
t
→T
g(t) = g
T
in the sense of currents and g(t) converges to
a metric of constant curvature on Σ after suitable normalization.
In the third case, there will be a curve C (may have several connected compo-
nents) such that
([ω
0
]
− T c
1
(M ))([C]) = 0,
so c
1
(M )([C]) > 0 and C must be made of disjoint holomorphic 2-spheres of self-
intersection
−1. Hence, we can blow down C to get a new complex manifold
M
1
, furthermore, there is a holomorphic map π : M
→ M
1
such that π
|
M
\C
is a
biholomorphism onto its image and π(C) consists of finitely many isolated points. It
was known that g(t) converges to g
T
in the sense of currents, moreover, it is proved
by Tian–Zhang [TZ06] that g
T
is a smooth K¨
ahler metric and g(t) converges to
g
T
in the smooth topology on M
\C. It is easy to see that g
T
= π

¯
g
T
for some
¯
g
T
on M
1
. In fact, Song–Weinkove [SW] proved that g(t) converges to ¯
g
T
in the
Gromov–Hausdorff topology. This can be also proved by using La Nave–Tian’s
V -soliton equation [LT].
It is proved in [ST09] that the Ricci flow (2.1) can continue on M
1
with initial
metric ¯
g
T
. Then we can repeat the above process, and it is clear that after finitely
many blow-downs, we will either run into a collapsed space or arrive at a complex
surface M without holomorphic spheres of self-intersection number >
−2, so the
Ricci flow has a global solution on M . In particular, if M is not birational to
CP
2
or a ruled surface, we have a global solution g(t) with surgery for (2.1) such
that each M
t
is a K¨
ahler surface obtained by blowing down rational curves of self-
intersection
−1 successively from previous M
t
, topologically, M is a connected sum
of M
t
and finitely many copies of
CP
2
with reversed orientation.
There are three possibilities for asymptotic behaviors of g(t) as t tends to

according to the Kodaira dimension κ(M ) of M :
1. If κ(M ) = 0, then c
1
(M )
R
= 0 or a finite cover of M is either a K3 surface or
an Abelian surface. In this case, the solution ˜
ω
t
on M converges to a Ricci flat

ahler metric.
In the other two cases, it is better to use the normalized K¨
ahler-Ricci flow on
M :
∂ ˜
ω(s)
∂s
=
−Ric(˜ω(s)) − ˜ω(s), ˜ω(0) = ω
0
,
where t = e
s
− 1 and ˜ω(s) = e
−s
˜
ω
t
.
2. If κ(M ) = 1, then M is a minimal elliptic surface: π : M
→ Σ. It was
proved in [ST07] that as s
→ ∞, ˜ω(s) converges to a positive current of the form
π


ω

) and the convergence is in the C
1,1
-topology on any compact subset outside
singular fibers F
p
1
,
· · · , F
p
k
, where p
1
,
· · · , p
k
∈ Σ. Furthermore, ˜ω

satisfies the
generalized K¨
ahler-Einstein equation:
Ric(˜
ω

) =
−˜ω

+ f

ω
W P
, on Σ
\{p
1
,
· · · .p
k
},
where f is the induced holomorphic map from Σ
\{p
1
,
· · · .p
k
} into the moduli of
elliptic curves.

GEOMETRIC ANALYSIS ON 4-MANIFOLDS
153
3. If κ(M ) = 2, then M is a surface of general type and its canonical model
M
can
is a K¨
ahler orbifold with possibly finitely many rational double points and
ample canonical bundle. By the version of the Aubin–Yau Theorem for orbifolds,
there is an unique K¨
ahler–Einstein metric ˜
ω

on X
can
with scalar curvature
−2.
It was proved in [TZ06] that as s
→ ∞, ˜ω(s) converges to ˜ω

and converges in
the C

-topology outside those rational curves over the rational double points.
Let us end this section with an interesting example: Suppose that π : M
→ S
2
is a simply-connected minimal elliptic surface. Write F
x
= π
−1
(x) and let p
1
,
· · · , p
be all the points in S
2
over which the fiber is singular. Let π : M
→ Σ be the
elliptic surface obtained by performing logarithmic transformations along two non-
singular fibers F
p
and F
q
of coprime multiplicities k and l. Then M is a minimal
elliptic surface homeomorphic but not diffeomorphic to M . If we run the K¨
ahler-
Ricci flow on both M and M , we get two generalized K¨
ahler-Einstein metrics g
on S
2
\{p
1
,
· · · , p } and g on S
2
\{p
1
,
· · · , p , p, q}. The asymptotic behaviors of
g and g are the same at each p
i
, while g is smooth at p or q and g has a conic
angle of 2π(k
− 1)/k at p or 2π(l − 1)/l q. Even though M and M are far from
each other, e.g., they are not diffeomorphic to each other, g and g resemble each
other and may be deformed to each other by smoothing out the angles at p and q.
Do we have a similar picture for general homeomorphic 4-manifolds which are not
diffeomorphic to each other?


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-secret-alliance--or.html

the-selection-of-david.html

the-sensing-subsystem-the.html

the-series-of-the-10.html

the-series-of-the-104.html