1 ... 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 ... 23

The Poincaré Conjecture Clay Research Conference Resolution of the Poincaré Conjecture Institut Henri Poincaré Paris, France, June 8–9, 2010 - bet 14

bet14/23
Sana08.07.2018
Hajmi3.97 Kb.
The cohomology ring H

(Gr
or
;
Q) is the polynomial ring in some
distinguished integer classes, called Pontryagin classes p
k
∈ H
4k
(Gr
or
;
Z),
k
= 1, 2, 3, ... [50].
(It would be awkward to express this in the homology language when N
= dim(X) →
∞, although the cohomology ring H

(X) is canonically isomorphic to H
N
−∗
(X)
by Poincar´
e duality.)
If X is a smooth oriented n-manifold, its Pontryagin classes p
k
(X) ∈ H
4k
(X; Z)
are defined as the classes induced from p
k
by the normal Gauss map
G
→ Gr
or
N
(R
N
+n
) ⊂ Gr
or
for an embedding X
→ R
n
+N
, N
>> n.
Example
(a). (see [50]). The the complex projective spaces have
p
k
(CP
n
) = (
n
+ 1
k
)h
2k
for the generator h
∈ H
2
(CP
n
) which is the Poincar´e dual to the hyperplane
CP
n
−1
⊂ CP
n
−1
.
Example
(b). The rational Pontryagin classes of the Cartesian products X
1
×
X
2
satisfy
p
k
(X
1
× X
2
) = ∑
i
+j=k
p
i
(X
1
) ⊗ p
j
(X
2
).
If Q is a unitary (i.e. a product of powers) monomial in p
i
of graded degree
n
= 4k, then the value Q(p
i
)[X] is called the (Pontryagin) Q-number. Equivalently,
this is the value of Q
(p
i
) ∈ H
4i
(Gr
or
;
Z) on the image of (the fundamental class) of
X in Gr
or
under the Gauss map.
The Thom theorem now can be reformulated as follows. Two closed oriented n-
manifolds are
Q-bordant if and only if they have equal Q-numbers for all monomials
Q. Thus,
B
o
n
⊗ Q = 0, unless n is divisible by 4 and the rank of B
o
n
⊗ Q for n = 4k

MANIFOLDS
107
equals the number of Q-monomials of graded degree n, that are

i
p
k
i
i
with

i
k
i
= k.
(We shall prove this later in this section, also see [50].)
For example, if n
= 4, then there is a single such monomial, p
1
; if n=8, there
two of them: p
2
and p
2
1
; if n
= 12 there three monomials: p
3
, p
1
p
2
and p
3
1
; if n
= 16
there are five of them.
In general, the number of such monomials, say π
(k) = rank(H
4k
(Gr
or
;
Q)) =
rank
Q
(B
o
4k
) (obviously) equals the number of the conjugacy classes in the permu-
tation group Π
(k) (which can be seen as a certain subgroup in the Weyl group
in SO
(4k)), where, by the Euler formula, the generating function E(t) = 1 +

k
=1,2,...
π
(k)t
k
satisfies
1
/E(t) = ∏
k
=1,2,...
(1 − t
k
) =

−∞(−1)
k
t
(3k
2
−k)/2
,
Here the first equality is obvious, the second is tricky (Euler himself was not able
to prove it) and where one knows now-a-days that
π
(k) ∼
exp


2k
/3)
4k

3
for k
→ ∞.
Since the top Pontryagin classes p
k
of the complex projective spaces do not
vanish, p
k
(CP
2k
) ≠ 0, the products of these spaces constitute a basis in B
o
n
⊗ Q.
Finally, notice that the bordism groups together make a commutative ring
under the Cartesian product of manifolds, denoted
B
o

, and the Thom theorem says
that
B
o

⊗ Q is the polynomial ring over Q in the variables [CP
2k
],
k
= 0, 2, 4, ....
Instead of
CP
2k
, one might take the compact quotients of the complex hy-
perbolic spaces
CH
2k
for the generators of
B
o

⊗ Q. The quotient spaces CH
2k

have two closely related attractive features: their tangent bundles admit natural
flat connections and their rational Pontryagin numbers are homotopy invariant,
see section 10. It would be interesting to find “natural bordisms” between (linear
combinations of) Cartesian products of
CH
2k
/Γ and of CP
2k
, e.g. associated to
complex analytic ramified coverings
CH
2k
/Γ → CP
2k
.
Since the signature is additive and also multiplicative under this product, it
defines a homomorphism
[sig] ∶ B
o

→ Z which can be expressed in each degree 4k
by means of a universal polynomial in the Pontryagin classes, denoted L
k
(p
i
), by
sig
(X) = L
k
(p
i
)[X] for all closed oriented 4k-manifolds X.
For example,
L
1
=
1
3
p
1
, L
2
=
1
45
(7p
2
− p
2
1
), L
3
=
1
945
(62p
3
− 13p
1
p
2
+ 2p
3
1
).
Accordingly,
sig
(X
4
) =
1
3
p
1
[X
4
],
(Rokhlin 1952)
sig
(X
8
) =
1
45
(7p
2
(X
8
) − p
2
1
(X
8
))[X
8
],
(Thom 1954)
and where a concise general formula (see blow) was derived by Hirzebruch who
evaluated the coefficients of L
k
using the above values of p
i
for the products

108
MIKHAIL GROMOV
X
= ×
j
CP
2k
j
of the complex projective spaces, which all have sig
(X) = 1, and
by substituting these products
×
j
CP
2k
j
with

j
4k
j
= n = 4k, for X = X
n
into
the formula sig
(X) = L
k
[X]. The outcome of this seemingly trivial computation is
unexpectedly beautiful.
Hirzebruch Signature Theorem. Let
R
(z) =

z
tanh
(

z
)
= 1 + z/3 − z
2
/45 + ... = 1 + 2 ∑
l
>0
(−1)
l
+1
ζ
(2l)z
l
π
2l
= 1 + ∑
l
>0
2
2l
B
2l
z
l
(2l)!
,
where ζ
(2l) = 1 +
1
2
2l
+
1
3
2l
+
1
4
2l
+ ... and let
B
2l
= (−1)
l
2lζ
(1 − 2l) = (−1)
l
+1
(2l)!ζ(2l)/2
2l
−1
π
2l
be the Bernoulli numbers [47],
B
2
= 1/6, B
4
= −1/30, ..., B
12
= −691/2730, B
14
= 7/6, ...,
B
30
= 8615841276005/14322, ... .
Write
R
(z
1
) ⋅ ... ⋅ R(z
k
) = 1 + P
1
(z
j
) + ... + P
k
(z
j
) + ...
where P
j
are homogeneous symmetric polynomials of degree j in z
1
, ..., z
k
and
rewrite
P
k
(z
j
) = L
k
(p
i
)
where p
i
= p
i
(z
1
, ..., z
k
) are the elementary symmetric functions in z
j
of degree i.
The Hirzebruch theorem says the following.
The above L
k
is exactly the polynomial which makes the equality
L
k
(p
i
)[X] = sig(X).
A significant aspect of this formula is that the Pontryagin numbers and the signature
are integers while the Hirzebruch polynomials L
k
have non-trivial denominators.
This yields certain universal divisibility properties of the Pontryagin numbers (and
sometimes of the signatures) for smooth closed orientable 4k-manifolds.
But despite a heavy integer load carried by the signature formula, its derivation
depends only on the rational bordism groups
B
o
n
⊗Q. This point of elementary linear
algebra was overlooked by Thom (isn’t it incredible?) who derived the signature
formula for 8-manifolds from his special and more difficult computation of the true
bordism group
B
o
8
. However, the shape given by Hirzebruch to this formula is
something more than just linear algebra.
Question. Is there an implementation of the analysis/arithmetic
encoded in the Hirzebruch formula by some infinite dimensional
manifolds?
Computation of the Cohomology of the Stable Grassmann Manifold.
First, we show that the cohomology H

(Gr
or
;
Q) is multiplicatively generated by
some classes e
i
∈ H

(Gr
or
;
Q) and then we prove that the L
i
-classes are multiplica-
tively independent. (See [50] for computation of the integer cohomology of the
Grassmann manifolds.)
Think of the unit tangent bundle U T
(S
n
) as the space of orthonormal 2-frames
in
R
n
+1
, and recall that U T
(S
2k
) is a rational homology (4k − 1)-sphere.

MANIFOLDS
109
Let W
k
= Gr
or
2k
+1
(R

) be the Grassmann manifold of oriented (2k + 1)-planes
in
R
N
, N
→ ∞, and let W
′′
k
consist of the pairs
(w, u) where w ∈ W
k
is an
(2k + 1)-
plane
R
2k
+1
w
⊂ R

, and u is an orthonormal frame (pair of orthonormal vectors) in
R
2k
+1
w
.
The map p
∶ W
′′
k
→ W
k
−1
= Gr
or
2k
−1
(R

) which assigns, to every (w, u), the
(2k − 1)-plane u

w
⊂ R
2k
+1
w
⊂ R

normal to u is a fibration with contractible fibers
that are spaces of orthonormal 2-frames in
R

⊖ u

w
= R
∞−(2k−1)
; hence, p is a
homotopy equivalence.
A more interesting fibration is q
∶ W
k
→ W
′′
k
for
(w, u) ↦ w with the fibers
U T
(S
2k
). Since UT (S
2k
) is a rational (4k−1)-sphere, the kernel of the cohomology
homomorphism q

∶ H

(W
′′
k
;
Q) → H

(W
k
;
Q) is generated, as a ⌣-ideal, by the
rational Euler class e
k
∈ H
4k
(W
′′
k
;
Q).
It follows by induction on k that the rational cohomology algebra of W
k
=
Gr
or
2k
+1
(R

) is generated by certain e
i
∈ H
4i
(W
k
;
Q), i = 0, 1, ..., k, and since
Gr
or
= lim
← k→∞
Gr
or
2k
+1
,
these e
i
also generate the cohomology of Gr
or
.
Direct Computation of the L-Classes for the Complex Projective
Spaces. Let V
→ X be an oriented vector bundle and, following Rokhlin-Schwartz
and Thom, define L-classes of V , without any reference to Pontryagin classes, as
follows. Assume that X is a manifold with a trivial tangent bundle; otherwise,
embed X into some
R
M
with large M and take its small regular neighbourhood.
By Serre’s theorem, there exists, for every homology class h
∈ H
4k
(X) = H
4k
(V ),
an m
= m(h) ≠ 0 such that the m-multiple of h is representable by a closed 4k-
submanifold Z
= Z
h
⊂ V that equals the pullback of a generic point in the sphere
S
M
−4k
under a generic map V
→ S
M
−4k
= R
M
−4k

with “compact support”, i.e.
where all but a compact subset in V goes to
● ∈ S
M
−4k
. Observe that such a Z has
trivial normal bundle in V .
Define L
(V ) = 1 + L
1
(V ) + L
2
(V ) + ... ∈ H
4

(V ; Q) = ⊕
k
H
4k
(V ; Q) by the
equality L
(V )(h) = sig(Z
h
)/m(h) for all h ∈ H
4k
(V ) = H
4k
(X).
If the bundle V is induced from W
→ Y by an f ∶ X → Y then L(V ) =
f

(L(W )), since, for dim(W ) > 2k (which we may assume), the generic image of
our Z in W has trivial normal bundle.
It is also clear that the bundle V
1
×V
2
→ X
1
×X
2
has L
(V
1
×V
2
) = L(V
1
)⊗L(V
2
)
by the Cartesian multiplicativity of the signature.
Consequently the L-class of the Whitney sum V
1
⊕ V
2
→ X of V
1
and V
2
over
X, which is defined as the restriction of V
1
× V
2
→ X × X to X
diag
⊂ X × X, satisfies
L
(V
1
⊕ V
2
) = L(V
1
) ⌣ L(V
2
).
Recall that the complex projective space
CP
k
– the space of
C-lines in C
k
+1
comes with the canonical
C-line bundle represented by these lines and denoted
U
→ CP
k
, while the same bundle with the reversed orientation is denoted U

. (We
always refer to the canonical orientations of
C-objects.)
Observe that U

= Hom
C
(U → θ) for the trivial C-bundle
θ
= CP
k
× C → CP
k
= Hom
C
(U → U)

110
MIKHAIL GROMOV
and that the Euler class e
(U

) = −e(U) equals the generator in H
2
(CP
k
) that
is the Poincar´
e dual of the hyperplane
CP
k
−1
⊂ CP
k
, and so e
l
is the dual of
CP
k
−l
⊂ CP
k
.
The Whitney
(k + 1)-multiple bundle of U

, denoted
(k + 1)U

, equals the
tangent bundle T
k
= T (CP
k
) plus θ. Indeed, let U

→ CP
k
be the
C
k
bundle of the
normals to the lines representing the points in
CP
k
. It is clear that U

⊕U = (k+1)θ,
i.e. U

⊕ U is the trivial C
k
+1
-bundle, and that, tautologically,
T
k
= Hom
C
(U → U

).
It follows that
T
k
⊕ θ = Hom
C
(U → U

⊕ U) = Hom
C
(U → (k + 1)θ) = (k + 1)U

.
Recall that
sig
(CP
2k
) = 1; hence, L
k
((k + 1)U

) = L
k
(T
k
) = e
2k
.
Now we compute L
(U

) = 1 + ∑
k
L
k
= 1 + ∑
k
l
2k
e
2k
, by equating e
2k
and the
2k-degree term in the
(k + 1)th power of this sum.
(1 + ∑
k
l
2k
e
2k
)
k
+1
= 1 + ... + e
2k
+ ...
Thus,
(1 + l
1
e
2
)
3
= 1 + 3l
1
+ ... = 1 + e
2
+ ...,
which makes l
1
= 1/3 and L
1
(U

) = e
2
/3.
Then
(1 + l
1
e
2
+ l
2
e
4
)
5
= 1 + ... + (10l
1
+ 5l
2
)e
4
+ ... = 1 + ... + e
4
+ ...
which implies that l
2
= 1/5 − 2l
1
= 1/5 − 2/3 and L
2
(U

) = (−7/15)e
4
, etc.
Finally, we compute all L-classes L
j
(T
2k
) = (L(U

))
k
+1
for T
2k
= T (CP
2k
) and
thus, all L

j
CP
2k
j
).
For example,
(L
1
(CP
8
))
2
[CP
8
] = 10/3 while (L
1
(CP
4
× CP
4
))
2
[CP
4
× CP
4
] = 2/3
which implies that
CP
4
×CP
4
and
CP
8
, which have equal signatures, are not ratio-
nally bordant, and similarly one sees that the products
×
j
CP
2k
j
are multiplicatively
independent in the bordism ring
B
o

⊗ Q as we stated earlier.
Combinatorial Pontryagin Classes. Rokhlin-Schwartz and independently
Thom applied their definition of L
k
, and hence of the rational Pontryagin classes, to
triangulated (not necessarily smooth) topological manifolds X by observing that the
pullbacks of generic points s
∈ S
n
−4k
under piece-wise linear map are
Q-manifolds
and by pointing out that the signatures of 4k-manifolds are invariant under bor-
disms by such
(4k + 1)-dimensional Q-manifolds with boundaries (by the Poincar´e
duality issuing from the Alexander duality, see Section 4). Thus, they have shown,
in particular, that the following holds.
Rational Pontryagin classes of smooth manifolds are invariant
under piece-wise smooth homeomorphisms between smooth man-
ifolds.

MANIFOLDS
111
The combinatorial pull-back argument breaks down in the topological category
since there is no good notion of a generic continuous map. Yet, S. Novikov (1966)
proved that the L-classes and, hence, the rational Pontryagin classes are invariant
under arbitrary homeomorphisms (see Section 10).
The Thom-Rokhlin-Schwartz argument delivers a definition of rational Pontrya-
gin classes for all
Q-manifolds which are by far more general objects than smooth
(or combinatorial) manifolds due to possibly enormous (and beautiful) fundamental
groups π
1
(L
n
−i−1
) of their links.
Yet, the naturally defined bordism ring
QB
o
n
of oriented
Q-manifolds is only
marginally different from
B
o

in the degrees n
≠ 4 where the natural homomorphisms
B
o
n
⊗ Q → QB
o
n
⊗ Q are isomorphisms. This can be easily derived by surgery (see
section 9) from Serre’s theorems. For example, if a
Q-manifold X has a single
singularity – a cone over
Q-sphere Σ then a connected sum of several copies of
Σ bounds a smooth
Q-ball which implies that a multiple of X is Q-bordant to a
smooth manifold.
On the contrary, the group
QB
o
4
⊗ Q, is much bigger than B
o
4
⊗ Q = Q as
rank
Q
(QB
o
4
) = ∞ (see [44], [22], [23] and references therein).
(It would be interesting to have a notion of “refined bordisms” between
Q-
manifold that would partially keep track of π
1
(L
n
−i−1
) for n > 4 as well.)
The simplest examples of
Q-manifolds are one point compactifications V
4k

of
the tangent bundles of even dimensional spheres, V
4k
= T (S
2k
) → S
2k
, since the
boundaries of the corresponding 2k-ball bundles are
Q-homological (2k −1)-spheres
– the unit tangent bundles U T
(S
2k
) → S
2k
.
Observe that the tangent bundles of spheres are stably trivial – they become
trivial after adding trivial bundles to them, namely the tangent bundle of S
2k

R
2k
+1
stabilizes to the trivial bundle upon adding the (trivial) normal bundle of
S
2k
⊂ R
2k
+1
to it. Consequently, the manifolds V
4k
= T (S
2k
) have all characteristic
classes zero, and V
4k

have all
Q-classes zero except for dimension 4k.
On the other hand, L
k
(V
4k

) = sig(V
4k

) = 1, since the tangent bundle V
4k
=
T
(S
2k
) → S
2k
has non-zero Euler number. Hence,
the
Q-manifolds V
4k

multiplicatively generate all of
QB
o

⊗ Q
except for
QB
o
4
.
Local Formulae for Combinatorial Pontryagin Numbers. Let X be a
closed oriented triangulated (smooth or combinatorial) 4k-manifold and let
{S
4k
−1
x
}
x
∈X
0
be the disjoint union of the oriented links S
4k
−1
x
of the vertices x in X. Then there
exists, for each monomial Q of the total degree 4k in the Pontryagin classes, an
assignment of rational numbers Q
[S
x
] to all S
4k
−1
x
, where Q
[S
4k
−1
x
] depend only
on the combinatorial types of the triangulations of S
x
induced from X, such that
the Pontryagin Q-number of X satisfies (Levitt-Rourke 1978),
Q
(p
i
)[X] =

S
4k
−1
x
∈[[X]]
Q
[S
4k
−1
x
].
Moreover, there is a canonical assignment of real numbers to S
4k
−1
x
with this prop-
erty which also applies to all
Q-manifolds (Cheeger 1983). There is no comparable
effective combinatorial formulae with a priori rational numbers Q
[S
x
] despite many
efforts in this direction, see [24] and references therein. (Levitt-Rourke theorem is

112
MIKHAIL GROMOV
purely existential and Cheeger’s definition depends on the L
2
-analysis of differential
forms on the non-singular locus of X away from the codimension 2 skeleton of X.)
Questions. Let
{[S
4k
−1
]

} be a finite collection of combinatorial isomorphism
classes of oriented triangulated
(4k−1)-spheres let Q
{[S
4k
−1
]

}
be the
Q-vector space
of functions q
∶ {[S
4k
−1
]

} → Q and let X be a closed oriented triangulated 4k-
manifold homeomorphic to the 4k-torus (or any parallelizable manifold for this
matter) with all its links in
{[S
4k
−1
]

}.
Denote by q
(X) ∈ Q
{[S
4k
−1
]

}
the function, such that q
(X)([S
4k
−1
]

) equals
the number of copies of
[S
4k
−1
]

in
{S
4k
−1
x
}


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-scientific-and-97.html

the-scientific-literatury.html

the-scope-of-the.html

the-search-for-primordial.html

the-seckingtons-of.html