The pedant genome database Dmitrij Frishman

tarix23.09.2017
ölçüsü95.4 Kb.

The PEDANT genome database

Dmitrij Frishman

1,

*, Martin Mokrejs

1

, Denis Kosykh

1

, Gabi Kastenmu¨ller

1

,

Grigory Kolesov

1

, Igor Zubrzycki

1

, Christian Gruber

2

, Birgitta Geier

2

, Andreas Kaps

2

, Kaj Albermann

2

, Andreas Volz

2

, Christian Wagner

2

, Matthias Fellenberg

2

, Klaus Heumann

2

and Hans-Werner Mewes

1,3

1

Institute for Bioinformatics, GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health, Ingolsta¨dter Landstraße 1,

85764 Neueherberg, Germany,

2

Biomax Informatics AG, Lochhamer Straße 11, 82152 Martinsried, Germany and

3

Department of Genome-oriented Bioinformatics, Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan, Technische Universita¨t

Mu¨nchen, 85350 Freising, Germany

Received August 13, 2002; Revised and Accepted September 12, 2002

ABSTRACT

The PEDANT genome database (http://pedant.gsf.de)

provides exhaustive automatic analysis of genomic

sequences by a large variety of established bioinfor-

matics tools through a comprehensive Web-based

user interface. One hundred and seventy seven

completely sequenced and unfinished genomes

have been processed so far, including large eukar-

yotic genomes (mouse, human) published recently.

In this contribution, we describe the current status of

the PEDANT database and novel analytical features

added to the PEDANT server in 2002. Those include:

(i) integration with the BioRS

TM

data retrieval system

which allows fast text queries, (ii) pre-computed

sequence clusters in each complete genome, (iii) a

comprehensive set of tools for genome comparison,

including genome comparison tables and protein

function prediction based on genomic context, and

(iv)


computation

and


visualization

of

protein–

protein interaction (PPI) networks based on experi-

mental data. The availability of functional and

structural predictions for 650 000 genomic proteins

in well organized form makes PEDANT a useful

resource

for


both

functional

and

structural

genomics.

OVERVIEW AND STATUS OF THE PEDANT

DATABASE IN 2003

When the first version of the PEDANT genome database was

launched in 1996 (1) it provided a computational analysis of

the five first completely sequenced genomes available at that

time using a limited set of algorithms and with results stored

as static HTML pages. In the past seven years, the PEDANT

genome analysis software has matured (2): it is now based on

an efficient relational database schema compatible with both

MySQL

TM and Oracle

TM

database management systems,

employs a broad range of modern bioinformatics methods to

analyze sequence data, and offers an extensive user interface.

In parallel, the database content was explosively growing

following the fast pace of genome sequencing projects.

However, the main concept of the database has not changed

since the first day of its existence. Since in-depth manual

annotation of all genomic sequences pouring into the

databases is virtually impossible our goal has been to provide

exhaustive functional

and structural characterization

of

publicly available genomes by automatic means in a timely

fashion. Being fully aware of the pitfalls of automatic

sequence analysis (3) we use reasonably stringent recognition

parameters to avoid excessive false positive rates, and at the

same time not only provide search and prediction results in

digested form, but also store the raw output of bioinformatics

methods, enabling the annotator or the biologist using the

database to make his own judgement on the significance of

the results presented.

At the time of writing the total of 177 genomes are

available on-line. The database consists of three major

sections:

1. Genomes which undergo careful in-depth analysis by the

MIPS biologists using the subsystem for manual annotation

available in the PEDANT software suite. This section

currently includes Neurospora crassa, Thermoplasma

acidophilum, and Arabidopsis thaliana.

2. Completely sequenced and published genomes. The main

source of sequence data for this section, including DNA

contigs and ORF nomenclature, is the genomes division of

GenBank (4), although in some cases we obtain data directly

from sequencing centres. Whenever possible we use data

manually curated by NCBI staff (ftp://ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/

genomes/Bacteria). If a curated version is not avail-

able, original data as submitted by the authors (ftp://

ftp.ncbi.nih.gov/genbank/genomes/Bacteria) is processed.

This section contains 5 eukaryotic, 84 eubacterial, and 16

archaebacterial datasets.

*To whom correspondence should be addressed. Tel:

þ49 89 31874201; Fax: þ49 89 31873585; Email: d.frishman@gsf.de

#

2003 Oxford University Press

Nucleic Acids Research, 2003, Vol. 31, No. 1

207–211


DOI: 10.1093/nar/gkg005

3. Unfinished genomic sequences. Gene prediction is con-

ducted by ORPHEUS (5) in a completely automatic

fashion, usually allowing for large overlaps between

ORFs. This leads to many over-predicted ORFs, but

ensures that fewer real ORFs are missed. In many cases,

the PEDANT database is the only source of annotation for

such datasets. In recent time, this section of the database

was growing slower then before because we chose to

commit our processing capacity to the quickly growing

number of completely sequenced genomes recently pub-

lished, including all publicly available eukaryotic genomes.

This section contains 15 eukaryotic, 51 eubacterial, and 3

archaebacterial datasets.

Among the most significant recent additions to the database is

mouse genome data obtained from http://genome.cse.ucsc.edu.

The mouse database contains 20 chromosome contigs with

37 793 genes predicted using the Fgenesh

þþ software

(www.softberry.com).

For each of the roughly 650 000 protein sequences processed

so far the following pre-computed analyses are available:

(A) Protein function



BLAST (6) similarity searches against the complete

non-redundant protein sequence database.



Motif searches against the Pfam (7), BLOCKS (8), and

PROSITE (9) databases. InterPro (10) calculations are

in preparation.



Predictions of cellular roles and functions based on high-

stringency BLAST searches against protein sequences

with manually assigned functional categories according

to the FunCat Functional Catalogue developed by MIPS

and Biomax Informatics AG. The FunCat catalogue

covers a broad range of biological concepts, including

cellular processes, systemic physiology, development

and anatomy for prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes,

plants and animals. In addition, genomes annotated with

other vocabularies (such as Gene Ontology) can be

mapped to FunCat annotations and thus integrated into

the similarity search, as already done for the genomes of

Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans.

At present, we use proteins with manually assigned

functional categories of the following species: plant

A.thaliana, fungi Saccharomyces cerevisiae, eubacter-

ium Listeria monocytogenes EGD and archaebacterium

T.acidophilum. More species-specific catalogues are in

preparation and will be available shortly (e.g. bacteria

Bacillus subtilis, Helicobacter pylori, N. crassa).



Similarity-based predictions of enzyme nomenclature

(EC numbers).



Similarity-based extraction of keywords and super-

family assignments from the PIR-International sequence

database (11).



Assignment of sequence to known clusters of ortholo-

gous groups [COGS, (12)].

(B) Protein structure



Sensitive similarity-based identification of known 3D

structures and structural domains. For this purpose, we

are using the IMPALA software (13) which allows

comparison of each gene product with a collection of

position specific scoring matrices, or profile library,

representing sequences with known three dimensional

structure from the PDB database (14) and sequences of

structural domains from the SCOP database (15). CATH

(16) domain predictions are being currently added to the

database.



Prediction

of

transmembrane

regions

using


the

TMHMM software (17).



Identification of local low similarity regions and entire

non-globular domains based on the SEG algorithm (18).



Prediction of coiled coil motifs (19).



Prediction of protein structural classes (all-a, all-b, a/b).

In some cases, further analyses may be available. For example,

for cDNA collections we conduct BLASTN searches against

relevant taxonomic subdivisions of the EMBL database (20).

Several additional methods to predict protein features, such as

localization or presence of signal peptides are implemented,

but not systematically used due to high error rates.

Perhaps the most characteristic feature of the PEDANT user

interface, available since its conception, is the automatic

assignment of gene products to various functional and

structural categories. There are two types of such categories:



Individual categories, such as sequences with homologues.

Selecting this category immediately leads to the list of

sequences possessing a BLAST hit, sorted by significance.

Further categories of this type are: sequences without

homology, non-identical closest homologues, sequences

with predicted transmembrane segments, coiled coils, low

complexity and non-globular regions.



Group categories, such as sequence and structure motifs.

Selecting such category first leads to the list of all groups

of a given type actually identified in a particular genome. In

a second step, the user selects an item of interest, e.g.,

a Pfam domain, and gets the list of sequences that are

predicted to possess this domain. Categories of this type

are: Pfam, BLOCKS, and PROSITE motifs, functional

categories, EC numbers, PIR keywords and superfamilies,

SCOP and CATH domains, COGs, as well as sequence

clusters (see below). In addition, BLAST similarity hits are

classified based on their taxonomic origin; additional

categories

in

the

taxonomy

section—superkingdom,

kingdom, phylum, class, and species—allow the user to

obtain the lists of respective taxonomic divisions and then

select sequences that have at least one BLAST hit in a given

division.

In addition, the following searches can be performed

interactively against protein sequences as well as DNA

sequences or ORFs and contigs of a particular genome:



BLAST search with a user query sequence



Sequence pattern search using the PROSITE regular

expression language

As soon as an ORF of interest has been selected from a given

category or based on an interactive search, an integrated,

hyperlinked protein report is provided showing analysis results

according to dynamically set thresholds. All evidence available

is summarized in the report, including a number of calculated

parameters, such as molecular weight, pI value, position of

the ORF on the contig, homology-derived data, as well as

208

Nucleic Acids Research, 2003, Vol. 31, No. 1



predicted structural features. A navigation toolbar in the upper

part of the report page allows access to the protein and DNA

sequence of a given ORF and the raw results of individual

computational methods. Those are also equipped with Web

links and can be used as reference for further manual

annotation. An advanced DNA viewer represents contigs in

graphical form and allows one to navigate, zoom, produce six-

frame translation, and show DNA features such as restriction

sites and genetic elements (genes, ORFs, exons, tRNAs, etc.).

The protein viewer visualizes information about similarity to

entries in the protein databases used and predicted protein

features, e.g. sequence motifs and secondary structure

elements. This is especially useful for judging on the domain

structure of the homology hits.

The public PEDANT database server has been upgraded in

terms of CPU speed, RAM memory and disk space. In order to

improve the performance of the public MySQL database

server, a separate server is utilized to conduct computations

and prepare the data. When newly created datasets pass

extensive quality tests and a substantial number of new

databases have been accumulated, a new release of the

PEDANT database is made. At the time of writing the version

of the database is 1.0.2.

SEARCHING AND DATA MINING IN THE PEDANT

GENOME DATABASE USING THE BioRS

TM

INTEGRATION AND RETRIEVAL SYSTEM

In order to enable users to take full advantage of the exhaustive

genome annotation available in the PEDANT database, fast

and efficient data mining and search capabilities must be

provided. However, given the enormous amount of pre-

computed bioinformatics analyses stored in MySQL tables

this requirement is not easy to meet. Although MySQL is

arguably the fastest relational database currently available a

simple text search for the word ‘kinase’ in only one 500 mB

table containing BLAST results for the A.thaliana genome

takes more than a minute to complete, and composite queries

in such large datasets are all but impossible.

To enhance the data-mining capabilities of the PEDANT

Genome Database its latest release has been integrated with the

BioRS Integration and Retrieval System developed by Biomax

Informatics AG (www.biomax.de). The BioRS system is able

to integrate and search flat-file databases as well as relational

databases (at present, MySQL, Oracle and DB2). Additional

index data structures are generated, allowing queries to be

processed on the index for enhanced query performance. The

original data source is accessed only when the user requests

the entire entry or when indexing is performed. Because the

open Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA)

is used as platform-independent middleware, indexing and

querying processes can be distributed over as many CPUs as

are available, facilitating timely updates of the indices.

The PEDANT GUI now provides an HTML-based search

form which allows one to specify complex search terms (using

wildcards) and apply them selectively to different parts of the

annotation, e.g. to search only in Pfam motifs, functional

categories or known 3D structures. Several instances of such

pairs of attributes and search values are provided and can be

combined by Boolean operators. Additional criteria for

searching include sequence length, number of transmembrane

regions, pI range and percentage of low complexity sequence.

After clicking the ‘Search’ button, a CGI program is initiated

to translate the values of the HTML search form into the

BioRS Query Language. The query is executed by the BioRS

core using search daemons and the results are returned to the

PEDANT client which then generates an HTML-based table

including hyperlinks to the corresponding protein reports.

Due to the use of pre-calculated indices search results are

returned essentially instantly, allowing interactive exploration

of the information contained in the PEDANT database. For

example, a search for A.thaliana proteins having the word

‘transcription’ in functional categories, the word ‘floral’ in

BLAST search results, the word ‘mads’ anywhere in the

annotation, and pI in the range from 4 to 8 finds 12 hits in the

11 gB annotation of the genome in just a few seconds.

SEQUENCE CLUSTERING AND PARALOGOUS

GENE FAMILIES

One of the important aspects of genome annotation involves

evaluation of gene duplication and the analysis of paralogous

gene families. Within each completely sequenced genome we

conduct an all against all comparison of proteins by PSI-

BLAST, with low complexity sequence regions masked.

Sequences possessing sufficient degree of similarity in a

reciprocal fashion (BLAST similarity score greater than

45 bits) are joined into single-linkage groups. In cases where

reciprocal BLAST comparisons produce only one local

alignment between two sequences in each direction, this hit

is made symmetrical by taking into account only the longer

alignment. Additionally, results of sensitive recognition of

Pfam domains through HMMER searches (21) are taken into

account. If two or more proteins in a genome display similarity

to the same Pfam domain with a significant E-value (typically

0.001), it may be safely assumed that the corresponding

protein sequence spans are similar to each other, even if

BLAST fails to recognize such relationships. Correspondingly,

by selecting the ‘sequence clusters’ category on the PEDANT

launch panel the user is presented with a list of sequence

clusters found in the given genome, with the number of

sequences in each cluster and the cluster name indicated. The

latter is automatically derived from the description lines of the

cluster sequences, with informative description lines given

priority over those containing the words ‘unknown’, ‘putative’,

and the like. For each cluster the list of sequences can be

displayed. In addition, a graphical representation of the cluster

is available in form of a circular diagram, visualizing the

structure of the BLAST and Pfam hits as well as the structural

information available for the cluster proteins (22).

COMPARATIVE GENOMICS

Starting from the year 2002 an exhaustive all-on-all BLAST

comparison of all protein sequences in completely sequenced

genomes is conducted for each major release of the PEDANT

database; the current version encompasses 165 000 proteins in

70 genomes. After selecting the ‘intergenome comparison’

Nucleic Acids Research, 2003, Vol. 31, No. 1

209


category on the launch panel the user may choose up to 10

genomes to be compared and obtain a table of similarity

relationships between a query genome and the selected target

genomes. Similarity hits are coloured according to their

BLAST score and equipped with links to respective genome

datasets. In addition, on each report page of proteins involved

in the cross-genome comparison a link ‘compare genomes

starting from this gene’ appears, leading to the appropriate

page of the genome comparison table. Such table is a very

convenient tool for quickly assessing the distribution of a given

gene across selected representatives of main taxonomic groups

or most important model organisms. Since chromosomal

coordinates of genes are also provided it is also possible to

estimate the conservation of genomic context around a given

gene of interest.

For more in-depth exploration of gene context we have

developed a novel computational method called SNAP

[Similarity-Neighbourhood APproach; (23)]. A Similarity-

Neighbourhood Graph (SN-Graph) is built that involves chains

of alternating S- and N-relationships. The former represent

BLAST similarity hits between putative orthologues in

different genomes while the latter involve neighbouring genes

on the same genome. An SN-Graph can thus be thought of as a

walk across many genomes which begins with a particular

gene in genome A and proceeds to its orthologue in genome B.

The walk then continues to encompass a given number of

neighbours of this orthologue on each side. Subsequently,

orthologues of these neighbours are found in other genomes,

their neighbours identified, and so on. Closed paths on an SN-

graph, that we call SN-cycles, are strongly non-random and

have the tendency to join functionally related genes involved in

the same biochemical process. A specialized Web server,

Snapper, has been developed which allows one to submit a

protein sequence for a SNAP analysis [http://pedant.gsf.de/

snapper; (24)]. This server takes full advantage of the

PEDANT functional annotation and provides links to

PEDANT entries. Conversely, a Snapper session can be

launched from any PEDANT database report page by pressing

the ‘submit this sequence for SNAP analysis’ button.

Yet another way to establish functional links between gene

products in a similarity-free fashion is through phylogenetic

profiling which involves finding genes with correlated

occurrence in different genomes (25). We have incorporated

a feature-rich implementation of this method (Wong et al., in

preparation) into the PEDANT server. In this case, too, the user

can invoke a profiling analysis for a gene of interest directly

from the PEDANT report page.

PROTEIN – PROTEIN INTERACTIONS

Another novel feature of the PEDANT database introduced in

2002 is the incorporation of the data on protein–protein

interactions (PPI). The information is directly imported from

the MIPS PPI catalogue [(26); http://mips.gsf.de/proj/yeast/

CYGD/interaction] which currently describes the total of

13 842 interactions for 4033 proteins from the S.cerevisiae

genome. In particular, the catalogue includes the following two

components: (i) the original PPI catalogue which was being

built by a group of MIPS biologists since 1997 based on

careful analysis of yeast literature (27). This ‘classical’ part of

the catalogue contains information on 1889 proteins involved

in 4924 interactions, classified into physical and genetic

interactions, and (ii) recently published data from large-scale

two-hybrid experiments [e.g., (28)]. After clicking on the

category ‘protein–protein interactions’ on the PEDANT launch

panel the user is presented with a list of individual experiments

(for convenience the ‘classic’ catalogue is treated as one

experiment although data come from hundreds of different

publications). For each experiment, a table of interactions

between pairs of ORFs is shown, interlinked to the

corresponding protein reports. In addition, individual disjoint

PPI networks can be delineated and visualized using a

graphical Java applet. Direct incorporation of PPI data into

PEDANT facilitates its efficient exploration in the context of

functional annotation (29). At present, this feature is only

available for the S.cerevisiae genome; data on other organisms

will be added in the future.

STRUCTURAL GENOMICS

The rich set of structural and functional characteristics derived

for each protein as well as the high degree of automation and

advanced analytical features make the PEDANT database a

useful tool for structural genomics. In particular, PEDANT can

be used to facilitate the target selection process. Using the

sequence clustering results described above it is easy to judge

the domain structure of the protein families. Further, circular

diagrams visualize available structural information on each

cluster member (domains with known three-dimensional

structure, transmembrane regions). Based on these pre-

computed results we have created an efficient target selection

tool called STRUDEL [STRucture DEtermination Logic;

(22)]. A Web-based interface for this tool allowing PEDANT

users to select structural targets of interest according to

specified criteria is currently being developed.

REFERENCES

1. Frishman,D. and Mewes,H.W. (1997) PEDANTic genome analysis.

Trends Genet., 13, 415–416.

2. Frishman,D., Albermann,K., Hani,J., Heumann,K., Metanomski,A.,

Zollner,A. and Mewes,H.W. (2001) Functional and structural genomics

using PEDANT. Bioinformatics, 17, 44–57.

3. Galperin,M.Y. and Koonin,E.V. (1998) Sources of systematic error in

functional annotation of genomes: domain rearrangement, non-orthologous

gene displacement and operon disruption. In Silico. Biol., 1, 55–67.

4. Benson,D.A., Karsch-Mizrachi,I., Lipman,D.J., Ostell,J., Rapp,B.A. and

Wheeler,D.L. (2002) GenBank. Nucleic Acids Res., 30, 17–20.

5. Frishman,D., Mironov,A., Mewes,H.W. and Gelfand,M. (1998) Combining

diverse evidence for gene recognition in completely sequenced bacterial

genomes. Nucleic Acids Res., 26, 2941–2947.

6. Altschul,S.F., Madden,T.L., Schaffer,A.A., Zhang,J., Zhang,Z., Miller,W.

and Lipman,D.J. (1997) Gapped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new

generation of protein database search programs. Nucleic Acids Res., 25,

3389–3402.

7. Bateman,A., Birney,E., Cerruti,L., Durbin,R., Etwiller,L., Eddy,S.R.,

Griffiths-Jones,S., Howe,K.L., Marshall,M. and Sonnhammer,E.L. (2002)

The Pfam protein families database. Nucleic Acids Res., 30, 276–280.

8. Henikoff,S., Henikoff,J.G. and Pietrokovski,S. (1999) Blocks

þ: a non-

redundant database of protein alignment blocks derived from multiple

compilations. Bioinformatics, 15, 471–479.

210

Nucleic Acids Research, 2003, Vol. 31, No. 1



9. Falquet,L., Pagni,M., Bucher,P., Hulo,N., Sigrist,C.J., Hofmann,K. and

Bairoch,A. (2002) The PROSITE database, its status in 2002. Nucleic

Acids Res., 30, 235–238.

10. Apweiler,R., Attwood,T.K., Bairoch,A., Bateman,A., Birney,E.,

Biswas,M., Bucher,P., Cerutti,L., Corpet,F., Croning,M.D. et al. (2001)

The InterPro database, an integrated documentation resource for

protein families, domains and functional sites. Nucleic Acids Res., 29,

37–40.


11. Barker,W.C., Garavelli,J.S., Huang,H., McGarvey,P.B., Orcutt,B.C.,

Srinivasarao,G.Y., Xiao,C., Yeh,L.S., Ledley,R.S., Janda,J.F. et al. (2000)

The protein information resource (PIR). Nucleic Acids Res., 28, 41–44.

12. Tatusov,R.L., Natale,D.A., Garkavtsev,I.V., Tatusova,T.A.,

Shankavaram,U.T., Rao,B.S., Kiryutin,B., Galperin,M.Y., Fedorova,N.D.

and Koonin,E.V. (2001) The COG database: new developments in

phylogenetic classification of proteins from complete genomes. Nucleic

Acids Res., 29, 22–28.

13. Schaffer,A.A., Wolf,Y.I., Ponting,C.P., Koonin,E.V., Aravind,L. and

Altschul,S.F. (1999) IMPALA: matching a protein sequence against a

collection of PSI-BLAST- constructed position-specific score matrices.

Bioinformatics, 15, 1000–1011.

14. Berman,H.M., Westbrook,J., Feng,Z., Gilliland,G., Bhat,T.N., Weissig,H.,

Shindyalov,I.N. and Bourne,P.E. (2000) The Protein Data Bank. Nucleic

Acids Res., 28, 235–242.

15. Lo,C.L., Brenner,S.E., Hubbard,T.J., Chothia,C. and Murzin,A.G. (2002)

SCOP database in 2002: refinements accommodate structural genomics.

Nucleic Acids Res., 30, 264–267.

16. Pearl,F.M., Martin,N., Bray,J.E., Buchan,D.W., Harrison,A.P., Lee,D.,

Reeves,G.A., Shepherd,A.J., Sillitoe,I., Todd,A.E. et al. (2001) A rapid

classification protocol for the CATH Domain Database to support

structural genomics. Nucleic Acids Res., 29, 223–227.

17. Krogh,A., Larsson,B., von Heijne,G. and Sonnhammer,E.L. (2001)

Predicting transmembrane protein topology with a hidden Markov model:

application to complete genomes. J. Mol. Biol., 305, 567–580.

18. Wootton,J.C. and Federhen,S. (1993) Statistics of local complexity in amino

acid sequences and sequence databases. Comput. Chem., 17, 149–163.

19. Lupas,A., Van Dyke,M. and Stock,J. (1991) Predicting coiled coils from

protein sequences. Science, 252, 1162–1164.

20. Stoesser,G., Baker,W., van den,Broek,A., Camon,E., Garcia-Pastor,M.,

Kanz,C., Kulikova,T., Leinonen,R., Lin,Q., Lombard,V. et al. (2002)

The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database. Nucleic Acids Res., 30, 21–26.

21. Eddy,S.R. (1998) Profile hidden Markov models. Bioinformatics,

14, 755–763.

22. Frishman,D. (2002) Knowledge-based selection of targets for structural

genomics. Protein Eng., 15, 169–183.

23. Kolesov,G., Mewes,H.W. and Frishman,D. (2001) Snapping up

functionally related genes based on context information: a colinearity-free

approach. J. Mol. Biol., 311, 639–656.

24. Kolesov,G., Mewes,H.W. and Frishman,D. (2002) SNAPper: gene order

predicts gene function. Bioinformatics, 18, 1017–1019.

25. Pellegrini,M., Marcotte,E.M., Thompson,M.J., Eisenberg,D. and Yeates,T.O.

(1999) Assigning protein functions by comparative genome analysis: protein

phylogenetic profiles. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 96, 4285–4288.

26. Mewes,H.W., Frishman,D., Guldener,U., Mannhaupt,G., Mayer,K.,

Mokrejs,M., Morgenstern,B., Munsterkotter,M., Rudd,S. and Weil,B.

(2002) MIPS: a database for genomes and protein sequences. Nucleic Acids

Res., 30, 31–34.

27. Mewes,H.W., Albermann,K., Bahr,M., Frishman,D., Gleissner,A., Hani,J.,

Heumann,K., Kleine,K., Maierl,A., Oliver,S.G. et al. (1997) Overview of

the yeast genome. Nature, 387, 7–65.

28. Uetz,P., Giot,L., Cagney,G., Mansfield,T.A., Judson,R.S., Knight,J.R.,

Lockshon,D., Narayan,V., Srinivasan,M., Pochart,P. et al. (2000) A

comprehensive analysis of protein-protein interactions in Saccharomyces

cerevisiae. Nature, 403, 623–627.

29. Fellenberg,M., Albermann,K., Zollner,A., Mewes,H.W. and Hani,J. (2000)

Integrative analysis of protein interaction data. Proc. Int. Conf. Intell. Syst.

Mol. Biol., 8, 152–161.

Nucleic Acids Research, 2003, Vol. 31, No. 1 211


Dostları ilə paylaş:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


the-place-names-of-sible-4.html

the-place-names-of-sible-44.html

the-place-names-of-sible-49.html

the-place-names-of-sible-53.html

the-place-names-of-sible-58.html